2017 Annual Session

April 21 - 25, 2017

Awards & Competitions

Charley Schultz Resident Scholar Award


Hellman, Sicher, Graber Awards

The deadline to apply for the 2017 Hellman, Sicher, Graber Awards was 6:00pm EDT on October 1, 2016. COSA meets early January 2017 to decide the winners. All applicants will be notified by email of the winners by January 15, 2017.
 
  • 2017 Hellman, Sicher, Graber Award Winners
  • The deadline to apply for the 2017 Hellman, Sicher, Graber Awards was 6:00pm EDT on October 1, 2016.
  • Biographical Sketch
  • Cover Letter for 2017 Hellman, Sicher, Graber Online Application
  • Information about the Hellman, Sicher, Graber Awards for 2017
  • Submission Checklist for the 2017 Hellman, Sicher, Graber Awards


AAO Awards and Annual Session Programs Open to Residents

The link below lists deadline information for the Hellman, Sicher, Graber Awards; the Charley Schultz Resident Scholar Award Program; and the Oral Research, Table Clinic and EPoster programs held at Annual Session:

Oral Research, Table Clinic, E-Poster Information

2017 Invitation to Participate

The application deadline was 6:00pm EDT on October 15, 2016.
The AAO is no longer accepting Oral Research, Table Clinic or EPoster applications for the 2017 AAO Annual Session.


Oral Research

2017 Oral Research Titles, Abstracts and Presentation Times
Oral Research Information for 2017 Annual Session
 

Table Clinics

2017 Table Clinic Titles and Authors Listing
Table Clinic Information for 2017 Annual Session
 

E-Posters

The deadline to upload an EPoster was Friday, March 24, 2017.

E-Poster Case Report Sample
E-Poster Research Sample

View 2017 Annual Session E-Posters (The last day to view the 2017 E-Posters was July 31, 2017)
The information contained in the E-Posters has not been reviewed by the AAO. Claims and representations made in an E-Poster are those of the authors alone.

2017 E-Poster Titles and Authors Listing
E-Poster Information for 2017 Annual Session
 

AAO Awards and Annual Session Programs Open to Residents

The link below lists deadline information for the Hellman, Sicher, Graber Awards; the Charley Schultz Resident Scholar Award Program; and the Oral Research, Table Clinic and EPoster programs held at Annual Session:
AAO Awards and Annual Session Programs Open to Residents

Schedule of Sessions

Fri | 8:00 AM - 5:30 PM

SDCC - 24

7 CE Credits

Chris Bentson BS | Brandon Collier JD, LLM | Thomas F. Ziegler DDS, MS, JD | Merritt Dake BS, CPA | Mark L. Dake DDS, MSD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Chris Bentson BS
Visually Enhanced Lecture
Speaker Has Financial Interest
Brandon Collier JD, LLM
Speaker Has Financial Interest
Thomas F. Ziegler DDS, MS, JD
Merritt Dake BS, CPA
Speaker Has Financial Interest
Mark L. Dake DDS, MSD
Speaker Has Financial Interest

Description:

The Seminar begins with 8:00 am breakfast, includes lunch, and ends with a reception at 4:30-5:30 pm. No matter which stage your career is in, the challenges and intricacies of an orthodontic practice transition can be daunting. This full-day program will address your questions, concerns and uncertainties from all angles. Join our esteemed panel of speakers – comprising two orthodontists, two attorneys and a certified public accountant – as they share their unique, expert approaches to practice transition. Topics to be addressed are: • Orthodontic Market Place Overview: Trends Affecting Owners and New and Younger Doctors (Chris Bentson) • Not All Group Practices Fail: Structuring the Transition to Address the Big Issues Fairly and Ensure Mutual Success (Brandon Collier) • Buyers and Sellers: A Guide to Practice Transition (Dr. Tom Ziegler) • The Evolution of Dentistry: How DSOs are Shaping Orthodontics (Dr. Mark Dake and Merritt Dake) You will also have the opportunity to learn from these individuals during a roundtable luncheon, as well as an interactive Q&A panel discussion. Complete the day by attending the networking cocktail reception, sponsored by Ziegler Practice Transitions. For more information, contact Brandon Hackworth at: bhackworth@aaortho.org.


Learning Objectives:

- Discuss transitioning from residency to practicing orthodontist
- List the steps of an orthodontic practice transition
- Explain the financial benchmarks in today’s orthodontic marketplace

Sat | 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Team

1 CE Credit

Dusty Green

Sessions:

Speakers:

Dusty Green
Speaker Has Financial Interest

Description:

Video is without question the most powerful form of marketing! And today marketing with video is more popular and more effective than ever. In this presentation, award-winning producer, videographer and director Dusty Green will guide you through the steps of creating an effective video marketing strategy, specifically with an eye toward marketing your orthodontic practice. Using video examples, he will show you how video can be used to get more prospective patients through your doors, how to turn prospective patients into new starts, and how to use video on social media platforms to engage with your patients and your community.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify exciting new ways to market their orthodontic practices using video.
- Manage effective strategies needed to implement video across social platforms.
- Recognize the importance of video to SEO, and how to use video to increase SEO.

Sat | 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

6A

Topic: TADs/ Anchorage Modalities

1.5 CE Credits

Ki Beom Kim DDS, MSD, PhD | Onur Kadioglu DDS, MS | Hyo-Sang Park DDS, MSD, PhD | Benedict Wilmes DMD, DDS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Ki Beom Kim DDS, MSD, PhD
Onur Kadioglu DDS, MS
Hyo-Sang Park DDS, MSD, PhD
Benedict Wilmes DMD, DDS

Description:

This lecture will discuss the examples of TSADs failures and iatrogenic problems created by TSADs. It will also show how to prevent these problems.


Learning Objectives:

- Define the common TSADs failures.
- Analyze the possible problems related to common TSAD biomechanics.
- Propose the simple mechanics to achieve the treatment goals.

Description:

Modern TADs have been around well over a decade as excellent sources of anchorage from treatment planning to biomechanics. They have evolved in design and technique. This presentation will evaluate where we stand with their use and recognize current concepts that have been universally accepted.


Learning Objectives:

- Evaluate the current status on TADs.
- Assess the most recent changes with recommendations.
- Address potential areas for future research.

Description:

The treatment of patients with hyper-divergent skeletal patterns have been considered as one of the most difficult task for orthodontists. With traditional mechanics, it was almost impossible to reduce vertical dimension during orthodontic treatment. Occlusal correction can be obtained but there was deterioration of facial harmony. The microimplants have brought tremendous paradigm shift in orthodontic treatment. Among those, the advances in vertical control are of a paramount importance. Nowadays, the intrusion of the posterior teeth with/or without anterior teeth can be achieved easily and consistently with microimplants. In openbite treatment, the intrusion of the posterior teeth is known as best treatment strategy. The intrusion of the posterior teeth can produce the increase of the anterior overbite, and resulted in resolution of the anterior openbite. However, even though intrusion of the posterior teeth is obtained and anterior openbite is closed, the profile improvement is less than desirable occasionally in Hyperdivergent patients. In order to get better profile changes, vertical control should be done not only in the posterior teeth but also in the anterior teeth. And this should be done on both arches, not to one arch. In hyper-divergent patients, the extraction of premolars can be planned and this will be helpful in reducing vertical dimension. However the facial changes can be very different according to which teeth are extracted. Occasionally, extraction of teeth may results in dished in face with counterclockwise rotation of the mandible. The cant of occlusal plane in antero-posterior dimension can also affect on facial harmony. Speaker will discuss the importance of extraction sites, and its role in controlling the occlusal plane, and importance of intrusion of the whole arch in regard to facial harmony.


Learning Objectives:

- Discuss importance of vertical control in facial profile changes.
- Demonstrate factors to get maximum changes of the face in hyperdivergent patients.
- Explain biomechanics concerning the microimplant treatment.

Description:

Congenitally missing lateral incisors or second premolars, extremely displaced canines, or severe trauma to the central incisors all result in a reduced upper dentition. The two most common treatment approaches are space closure or space opening to allow prosthodontic replacement with either a fixed prosthesis or single-tooth implants. Both of these approaches involve compromises in terms of esthetics, periodontal health, and function.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the advantages and disadvantages of palatal TAD borne mesialization.
- Identify recommendable insertion sites in the palate.
- Design an appropriate TAD borne mechanics depending on the treatment objective.

Sat | 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

6B

Topic: Sleep Apnea

1.5 CE Credits

Alan A. Lowe DDS, CertOrtho | Paul Lazari DDS, MS | Rose D. Sheats DMD, MPH

Sessions:

Speakers:

Alan A. Lowe DDS, CertOrtho
Speaker Has Financial Interest
Paul Lazari DDS, MS
Rose D. Sheats DMD, MPH

Description:

Orthodontists, with their knowledge of functional appliances and established skills to evaluate jaw position, are ideally suited to provide oral appliance therapy in this field. Oral appliances have a direct effect on tongue posture during sleep and help to stabilize the mandible in a closed vertical position. These appliances are commonly regarded as a simple, silent, bed partner-friendly, less invasive, reversible, tolerable and efficacious choice. Several factors appear to contribute to the effectiveness of oral appliances – appliance design and titration method, the severity of the sleep apnea, the amount of advancement, the vertical opening of the mandible, positional sleep apnea and the Body Mass Index (BMI). Oral appliances appear to work by enlarging the upper airway patency at multiple levels and by improving muscle airway tone and thus decreasing upper airway collapsibility. The advantages and disadvantages of four different oral appliance titration techniques will be discussed to facilitate better utilization of oral appliances in dental sleep medicine.


Learning Objectives:

- Describe the indications, contraindications, advantages and disadvantages of the currently-available oral appliances used in the field.
- Outline how to titrate an adjustable oral appliance to achieve the maximum effectiveness for the treatment of snoring and/or OSA.
- Discuss the results of clinical trials designed to compare the effectiveness of specific oral appliances and how they might compare to nasal continuous positive airway pressure or surgical procedures.

Description:

Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) has been widely investigated as a potential source of biomarkers for an individual’s oral and general health information. Various biomolecules presented in GCF were reported as potential biomarkers for orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Secretory miRNAs are being investigated as diagnostic as well as therapeutic tools in many pathological conditions. In this study, we investigated the expression profile of secretory miRNA-29 in GCF during OTM in human.


Learning Objectives:

- Demonstrate the presence of secretory miRNAs in GCF.
- Investigate the expression profile of secretory miRNA-29 in GCF during canine retraction in human.

Description:

This lecture will focus on the potential role of orthodontists in collaborating with medical colleagues to manage pediatric and adolescent sleep disordered breathing.


Learning Objectives:

- Describe possible adverse impact on craniofacial growth of childhood use of positive airway pressure for sleep disordered breathing (SDB).
- Explain to medical colleagues the limitations of rapid maxillary expansion as a strategy to manage pediatric SDB.
- Discuss the controversy regarding the association of orthodontic premolar extractions and development of SDB.

Sat | 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

6C

Topic: Treatment Planning

1.5 CE Credits

Mireille Guibert DCD, CECSMO, SQOF | Robert Garcia DCD, DSO, DECD, DUO Paris 7, SQOF | Edward Y. Lin DDS, MS | Lorenz Moser MD, DDS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Mireille Guibert DCD, CECSMO, SQOF
Robert Garcia DCD, DSO, DECD, DUO Paris 7, SQOF
Edward Y. Lin DDS, MS
Lorenz Moser MD, DDS

Description:

Orthodontic treatment of cranio-maxillo-mandibular dysmorphia is based on an accurate diagnosis of the intra-arch anomalies (agenesis, supernumerary teeth, impacted teeth, dental discrepancies...), the inter-arch gaps observed (sagittal, vertical and/or transverse) and the associated dysfunctions. For each anomaly, gap and/or dysfunction, a therapeutic flow-chart enables a treatment strategy to be established based on the age of the patient and the severity of the symptoms. The superposition of these flow-charts allows the treatment to be refined as much as possible and enables a prognostic to be established. It is therefore important to understand all of the problems in order to take action at the best time.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify a complete dento facial diagnosis.
- Determine a treament strategy.
- Manage various therapeutic flow-charts.

Description:

This lecture will review the diagnosis, treatment plans, and treatment mechanics for 2 complex open bite cases. The first case is an adult patient with a severe anterior open bite and right posterior crossbite treated w/ SureSmile, TADs, and Acceledent. The second case is a late adolescent with a right unilateral Class III and right posterior open bite treated w/ RPE, SureSmile, and TADs.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the incredible benefits with digital orthodontic treatment.
- Explain the incredible benefits of utilizing TADs for non-surgical treatment w/ difficult open bite cases.
- Evaluate the benefits w/ accelerated orthodontic appliances such as Acceledent.

Description:

After 30 years in practice the overwhelming majority of patients can be treated with a certain routine. However, from time to time even the most experienced orthodontist is faces with issues which require brave and unorthodox treatment concepts. Four patients will illustrate these diagnostic and therapeutic challenges with special regard to finishing procedures.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize that correct diagnosis and treatment planning are far more important than the use of sophisticated high-tech mechanics.
- Recognize that extraction therapies are still valid treatment approaches even in times of non-extraction hype.
- Assess awareness of heroic orthodontics.

Sat | 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

6D

Topic: Class II Correction

1.5 CE Credits

Calogero Dolce DDS, PhD | Hans Ulrik Paulsen DDS, Odont. | Stephen K. McCullough BS, DDS, MS | Silvia Allegrini DMD, MScD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Calogero Dolce DDS, PhD
Hans Ulrik Paulsen DDS, Odont.
Stephen K. McCullough BS, DDS, MS
Silvia Allegrini DMD, MScD

Description:

Class II malocclusion affects about 15-20% of the United Stated population. However, the precise etiology, involving environmental and genetic components, remains unclear. To characterize the disorder, lateral cephalometric films are digitalized resulting in numerous linear and angular measurements. Correlational analysis provides limited insights regarding common features or distinctive subgroups. The use of data reduction techniques, such as principal component analysis, and clustering algorithms may provide another grouping strategy. For the current analysis, cephalometric measurements from participants enrolled in the Florida Class II Malocclusion study were used. Participants’ mean age at baseline visit was 9.6 (range 6.9 -12.9). Measurements used include skeletal, soft tissue and dental measures. Early treatment results among groups are described.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize various subgroups in the clinical presentation of a Class II malocclusion.
- Describe various grouping strategy for the classification of a Class II malocclusion.
- Identify etiologic factors underlying Class II malocclusion.

Description:

This lecture is based on a histomorphometric and scanning electron microscopy study of human condylar cartilage and bone tissue changes in relation to age. Its aim is to determine the possibility of stimulated adaptive growth in human condylar cartilage and bone tissue changes in relation to age in a larger sample of human autopsy condyles. Human condylar cartilage and bone were examined in an autopsy material comprising 20 individuals aged 18-31 years. The condyles were embedded in methylmetacrylate and cut on a microtome and stained. Histomorphometry, scanning electron microscopy and cartilage histology were used to analyse the tissue. The fibrocartilage could clearly be described in four zones: the hypertropic zone with `caught´ hypertropic chondrocytes, the hypertropic zone of chondrocytes arranged in columns, the proliferative zone, and the fibrous zone with collagen fibres. Chondrocytes could bee seen `caught´ in the underlying cancellous bone tissue with remodelling activity. There was a statistically significant correlation between age and the fibrocartilage thickness, between age and the hypertropic chondrocytes, and between age and the hypertropic chondrocytes in bone. In conclusion, quantitative and qualitative investigations of the turnover activity in the fibrocartilage and the bone tissue indicated condylar growth potential in the age group until 31 years of age. The growth activity seemed to decline with age. The results show possibilities for biomechanical growth stimulation of the condylar tissue, ie. Herbst treatment as an alternative to surgical treatment. A clinical Herbst treated case in adulthood will end up the lecture presentation.


Learning Objectives:

- Discuss histomorphometric and scanning electron microscopy study of human autopsy condylar cartilage and bone tissue changes in relation to age.
- Interpret whether there are any active cells after 20 years in the condyles.
- Apply knowledge about clinical Herbst treatment of patients, 18-31 years.

Description:

All Class II malocclusions are not created equal. A comprehensive diagnosis and individualized treatment plan are necessary to ensure that each patient receives the proper treatment for their specific problems. Several cases having different Class II malocclusions, treated with the appropriate diagnosis, treatment plan and mechanics, will be shown.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the need of comprehensive orthodontic records for Class II patients.
- Evaluate the orthodontic records to identify the problem areas for Class II patients.
- Determine an appropriate treatment plan for these patients for the best facial esthetics, dental health, occlusal function, and long term stability.

Description:

With the introduction of new technologies such as the use of TADs and accelerated tooth movement the attention of clinicians has shifted from the growing to the non growing patient. While maintaining interest in early treatment, the increased ability to control anchorage without compliance in the second phase of treatment has given the idea of full control of biomechanics, while surgical intervention is proposed to control treatment time. Growing patients with Class II malocclusions are still the daily bread in clinical practice. Proposed timings of treatment are either related to skeletal maturation or stage of dental development. Skeletal timing tries to address the mandibular retrognathism which is a component of Class II malocclusion in a high number of patients. Dental timing aims to consistently achieve good occlusal results in non extraction treatment. Purpose of the presentation is to discuss skeletal and dental timings of treatment and their clinical significance relative to biomechanics, length of treatment and prognosis.


Learning Objectives:

- Deduce that skeletal timing of treatment does not avoid surgery in retrognathic Class II patients.
- Deduce that dental timing helps non extraction Class II treatment to consistently achieve a Class I molar occlusion.
- Deduce that skeletal and dental timings of treatment do not result in clinically significant different amount of mandibular growth.

Sat | 8:00 AM - 11:00 AM

SDCC - 23

0 CE Credits

John K. McGill

Sessions:

Speakers:

John K. McGill

Description:

Orthodontic Mastery: A Business Perspective Now is the time for ACTION. Obtain Financial Success in private practice and corporate environments. Evaluate the metrics in your practice, and adapt to the ever changing orthodontic business world.


Sat | 8:00 AM - 11:00 AM

SDCC - 33

2.5 CE Credits

Elizabeth Franklin BA, MA | Joseph Kutyla BA, JD | Robert E. Varner DMD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Elizabeth Franklin BA, MA
Joseph Kutyla BA, JD
Robert E. Varner DMD

Description:

Orthodontists work hard to create beautiful smiles and give their patients healthy teeth. When a patient or parent is dissatisfied and files a malpractice claim or regulatory complaint, it is discouraging and stressful. Attend this program to learn which areas of practice currently cause the most risk and how to make changes that will minimize exposure. This risk management program is sponsored by the AAO Council on Insurance and the AAOIC (RRG). The speakers will be an orthodontist with experience reviewing and evaluating orthodontic malpractice claims, a malpractice defense attorney who handles orthodontic malpractice claims, and an insurance claims representative who specializes in handling orthodontic malpractice claims. AAOIC (RRG) insureds will earn a 10% Professional Liability premium discount by attending this entire event.


Learning Objectives:

- Create good quality and detailed orthodontic records that will enhance patient care and provide maximum defense if a claim is filed
- Assess why obtaining informed consent is critical to your protection from claims. See the multiple tools available to achieve that protection
- Recognize and diffuse problem patient situations early

Sat | 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Team

1 CE Credit

Todd Ehrler DDS, MS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Todd Ehrler DDS, MS
Speaker Has Financial Interest

Description:

There is no question 3D printing is a disruptive technology in Orthodontics. An overview of available 3D printers will be reviewed that are candidates for the orthodontic practice. After selecting the appropriate 3D printer, a step by step guide will be presented on how to integrate 3D printing into the orthodontic practice. Orthodontic specific techniques and workflows of 3D printing will be taught that will dramatically increase practice efficiency and profitability.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify and select a 3D printer for your orthodontic practice.
- Integrate 3D printing into your orthodontic practice.
- Perform and manage new workflows and techniques with 3D printing to increase practice efficiency and profitability.

Sat | 9:45 AM - 11:15 AM

6A

Topic: TADs/ Anchorage Modalities

1.5 CE Credits

Mithran S. Goonewardene BDS, MMSc, FIDC, FADI | Hugo De Clerck DDS, PhD | Ramzi Victor Haddad DDS, MS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Mithran S. Goonewardene BDS, MMSc, FIDC, FADI
Hugo De Clerck DDS, PhD
Speaker Has Financial Interest
Ramzi Victor Haddad DDS, MS
Visually Enhanced Lecture

Description:

Conventional orthodontic preparation of the dentition prior to surgery is often limited by the extent of required pre-surgical orthodontics. Temporary anchors may be used to assist in expanding the range of decompensation of the dentition prior to surgery or compensation of the dentition when surgery is performed prior to complete decompensation of the dentition. This lecture will discuss the rationale for selection of the appropriate pre and/or or post-surgically assisted application of temporary anchors.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify limitations associated with routine orthodontic preparation for combined surgery and orthodontics.
- Evaluate the indications for pre-surgical application of temporary anchor devices.
- Determine the indications for post-surgical application of temporary anchor devices.

Description:

Rotations of the occlusal plane not only affect the vertical dimension of the growing face but also the anteroposterior relation between upper and lower jaw. Conventional tooth born class III orthopedics often result in upper molar extrusion and posterior rotation of the mandible, with increase of the length and convexity of the face, which sometimes is wrongly interpreted as a restraint of mandibular growth. Furthermore, a counter clockwise rotation of the palatal plane, by the line of force passing below the center of resistance of the zygomatico-maxillary complex, may also result in a downward movement of the upper molars. These maxillary rotations can be altered by changing the angulation of the orthopedic force and it’s perpendicular distance to the center of resistance, or by adding an extra moment of force. Finally the moment-to-force ratio of the resulting orthopedic force system applied to the upper jaw will determine the direction of the maxillary rotation, and the subsequent rotations of the occlusal plane and the mandible.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify rotations of the occlusal plane and palatal plane by different class III orthopedics.
- Evaluate biomechanics of maxillary rotations.
- Analyze the effect of canting of the occlusal plane on mandibular rotations.

Description:

Mini-implants are one of the latest successful technologies introduced and widely used in orthodontic treatment, as a reinforcement of anchorage. Same concepts adopted to treat different types of malocclusions in the past are still used, but with the raise of mini-implants era, the mechanical considerations of these traditional strategies need to be revisited. Nevertheless, ignorance of the entire mechanical effects that result from usage of mini-implants might cause undesirable outcomes which can complicate the orthodontic treatment. In this lecture, we will show how mini-implants can facilitate our orthodontic treatment, highlighting at the same time the failure of these techniques in some circumstances.


Learning Objectives:

- Compare the treatment of malocclusions between the traditional orthodontic methods versus systems that include mechanics based on mini-implants.
- Manage the side effects that can result from uncontrolled mechanics of usage of miniscrews.
- Identify the different factors that may contribute to the failure of mini-implants.

Sat | 9:45 AM - 11:15 AM

6B

Topic: Sleep Apnea

1.5 CE Credits

Benjamin Pliska DDS, MS, FRCD(C) | Marianna Evans | Mark G. Hans DDS, MSD | George J. Cisneros DMD, MMSc | Viraj Mukesh Doshi CertDental, CertOrtho | Mona N. Bajestan DDS, CertOrtho

Sessions:

Speakers:

Benjamin Pliska DDS, MS, FRCD(C)
Marianna Evans
Mark G. Hans DDS, MSD
George J. Cisneros DMD, MMSc
Viraj Mukesh Doshi CertDental, CertOrtho
Mona N. Bajestan DDS, CertOrtho

Description:

Oral appliances are an accepted first line of treatment for a wide range of adults with obstructive sleep apnea. As specialists in dentofacial orthopaedics, orthodontists are ideally suited to deliver this increasingly popular OSA treatment modality and should be well aware of both the associated benefits and complications. This presentation will focus on the latest evidence regarding the effectiveness of oral appliance treatment of OSA, as well as review the management of the most common side effects.


Learning Objectives:

- Describe the effectiveness of oral appliance treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in adults.
- Recognize the side effects commonly associated with oral appliance treatment.
- Propose best practices in long-term patient management.

Description:

Obstructive Sleep Apnea is a health and life threatening condition affecting adults and children. Current evidence suggests that certain types of craniofacial morphology such as maxillary and mandibular deficiencies predispose to OSA. Therefore, early orthopedic dento-skeletal maxillary and mandibular development may be critical treatment modality in resolving  and preventing OSA. This lecture will discuss current evidence and future vision for orthodontic profession taking the lead in management of this serious medical condition.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize types of craniofacial morphology predisposing to OSA with the aid of CBCT imaging.
- Recognize treatment and prevention modalities in addressing OSA in pediatric and adult patients.
- Discuss and analyze current literature on OSA.

Description:

Overnight polysomnolgaphy in a sleep laboratory remains the gold standard for diagnosis of sleep disordered breathing (SDB). However, the high cost and inconvenience of this test makes home monitoring an attractive alternative. This lecture will discuss the merits of home monitoring as well as the use of the Pediatric Sleep Questionaire to identify patients at risk for SDB in the orthodontic practice. And, importantly, what to do when you find them.


Learning Objectives:

- Analyze the differences between at-home monitoring and Overnight PSG.
- Define the score on the PSQ that puts a patient in the at-risk category.
- Evaluate the health consequences of SDB for teenagers.

Description:

Sleep apnea has been part of the human experience centuries before Charles Dickens’ ‘Pickwick Papers’ actually made it part of our culture in the 19th century. At that time, however, most of the focus was on one of the character’s obesity rather than the sleeping disorder associated with it. It wasn’t till the early ‘60s that the complexity and variability of expression associated with sleep disorders was more fully appreciated as the use of polysomnography made it possible to fully document apneas during sleep. Soon we were able to begin to effectively address the disorder’s etiologies thanks to the proliferation of Sleep Centers around the globe. As a result, all sorts of therapeutic approaches evolved ranging from drug & inhalation therapies, to various surgical and appliance methodologies/gizmologies. But how far have we progressed in effectively managing or eliminating this condition as now more reports document its worldwide impact. Its prevalence persists at ever-higher rates across a wider variety of ethnic groups, and even increasing in the pediatric population as well. What have we accomplished to date in sleep medicine? Why are matters apparently getting worse in this field? What is it that we are missing? Where should we better focus our efforts? This presentation will attempt to address these concerns by: reviewing the history of sleep-disorders and our accomplishments in managing them. It will focus on how we as healthcare providers can help our patients better manage their conditions beyond the mere use of intraoral appliances.


Learning Objectives:

- Discuss the historical & epidemiological ramifications associated with sleep-disordered breathing disorders.
- Identify the multivariate etiology behind sleep apnea and other sleep-disordered breathing conditions.
- Offer better options needed to help manage the care for sleep apnea and sleep-disordered breathing patients.

Description:

This meta-analysis aims to analyze current literature for evidence on rate of tooth movement using conventional and non conventional methods for accelerated tooth movement. The methodological soundness of original studies affecting data acquisition of this meta analysis will be discussed.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify and analyze the rate of tooth movement using conventional and non conventional methods.
- Identify and analyze the level of evidence and methodological soundness as far as the different methods of tooth movement is concerned.

Description:

Autogenous alveolar bone grafting prior to oral implant therapy is considered standard-of-care for patients with severe alveolar defects such as the bony defects in patients with cleft palate. Though routine, these grafting procedures are often associated with significant morbidity of the donor site. More novel, less invasive techniques are needed to circumvent these limitations. The objective of this study was to determine whether an autologous stem cell-based therapy is safe and efficacious in the regeneration of large alveolar defects.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize that transplantation of autologous stem cells can be used safely for the reconstruction of large craniofacial defects.
- Demonstrate that although stem cell therapy is less invasive than traditional treatment, further development of this approach is needed to optimize treatment outcomes to meet those of the standard-of-care used to treat more complex defects such as those resulting from cleft palate.

Sat | 9:45 AM - 11:15 AM

6C

Topic: Treatment Planning

1.5 CE Credits

G. Thomas Kluemper DMD, MS | David S. Briss DMD | Takashi Ono DDS, PhD | Brad A. Chvatal DMD, MS

Sessions:

Speakers:

G. Thomas Kluemper DMD, MS
David S. Briss DMD
Takashi Ono DDS, PhD
Brad A. Chvatal DMD, MS

Description:

Excessive gingival show is a leading candidate for one of the more unattractive features of the human smile. Patients want it fixed and dental providers are quick to offer a remedy. However, the success of our treatment depends directly on etiology. There can be many underlying reasons for the gummy smile. One of the more common, yet least understood etiologic factors is Altered Passive Eruption (APE). This presentation will attempt to define APE, review its multiple patterns and put the options for treatment into a proper and helpful perspective.


Learning Objectives:

- Define Altered Passive Eruption.
- Distinguish between the four different clinical presentations of APE.
- Determine appropriate treatment strategies for APE.

Description:

Treatment planning for the dental arch has often relied on interpretation of root position based on external factors; buccolingual position, torque and angulation of the crowns, or the shape of the alveolar crest have been used in various ways to develop bracket and wire systems that should put the roots of the teeth within the alveolar bone. Various shapes and methods of determining arch shapes have also been proposed. With the ready availability of CBCT imaging we now have the ability to look directly at the position of the root within the bone and to determine more precise relationships between the teeth and the bone. Combining this imaging technique with 3 dimensional shape analysis can now give us a different way to explore the relationship between coronal arch form and apical arch form. Morphometric techniques can also tell us what happens to the shape of the dental arch at various levels in the bone after treatment, which should inform our ability to more accurately predict and modify our treatment at the coronal level to anticipate outcomes at the apical level.


Learning Objectives:

- Assess classical methods of determining the mandibular dental arch form.
- Describe the method of 3 dimensional morphometric analysis as applied to the mandibular teeth.
- Introduce and evaluate some recent morphometric research on the mandibular dental arch form and make suggestions for future research.

Description:

Facial asymmetry is a common chief complaint in orthodontic patients. Asymmetries can be classified according to various factors, including skeletal, dentoalveolar, and functional factors. Detailed records of clinical and radiographic examinations are essential for the determination of skeletal, dentoalveolar, and/or functional involvement. To provide a patient-oriented treatment strategy, a thorough examination of the records and consideration of suitable alternatives is essential to decide on the best method for management of facial asymmetry. This lecture will discuss how to approach the appropriate treatment planning for patients with facial asymmetry based on a thorough examination.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the importance of clinical and radiological examinations for proper diagnosis.
- Identify the involvement of skeletal, dentoalveolar, and/or functional factors in facial asymmetry.
- Propose the appropriate treatment strategy according to the nature of facial asymmetry.

Description:

"Improve Facial Esthetics" is often a goal of orthodontic treatment. Proper diagnosis and mechanics of treatment can lead to excellent facial changes in non-growing individuals without surgery. This lecture will review orthodontic treatment that is not overly complex to effect facial changes in typical patients we all see in our practices.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize when facial changes are possible in non-growing individuals.
- Perform non-surgical treatments and effect a facial change.
- Manage extraction spaces to move teeth to maximally change profiles.

Sat | 9:45 AM - 11:15 AM

6D

Topic: Class II Correction

1.5 CE Credits

Jose Nelson Mucha DDS, MSD, PhD | Giovanni Biondi DDS, MD | Antonio Carlos de Oliveira Ruellas MSc, PhD | Joseph Ghafari DMD, CertOrtho

Sessions:

Speakers:

Jose Nelson Mucha DDS, MSD, PhD
Giovanni Biondi DDS, MD
Antonio Carlos de Oliveira Ruellas MSc, PhD
Joseph Ghafari DMD, CertOrtho

Description:

The main Class II adult complaining is the typical facial profile aspect. Treatment can range since (1) Extractions, (2) Temporary Anchorage Devices, (3) Orthognathic Surgery or (4) Various Combinations. The decision-making processes must be founded on diagnostic tools, objectives to be achieved and patients decision. The objective is to diisplay significant outcome in the facial profile with simple and predictable treatment approaches with evidence that old procedures remain updated. A case series of facial profiles attractiveness judgment before and after treatment scores as very good/excellent, good, fair and poor. Presentation of clinical case series and approaches used. Resulting in significant improvement in facial profile aesthetics. The concepts assigned varied from deficient in all cases before treatment to very good/excellent after treatment. Concluding in simpler procedures can lead to higher results in shorter time and with predictable results.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify and distinguish significant improvement in facial profile aesthetics.
- Recognize that old procedures for facial aesthetics problems remain updated.
- Presume that simpler procedure can lead to higher and predictable results in shorter time.

Description:

A review of Merrifield-Gebeck's article "Analysis: Concepts and Values" gives us a chance to revisit the importance of the control of the occlusal plane and of the vertical dimension in order to facilitate a mandibular response in class II patients.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify the correlation between control of the occlusal plane and mandibular response.
- Identify the reasons of the unsuccessful control of the occlusal plane.
- Examine the importance of the maintenance of an appropriate uprighting of the lower incisors.

Description:

The lecture will emphasize the importance of having a proper diagnosis to define the correct treatment planning. The proposed planning will be guided by the cause of the Class II malocclusion whether dental, skeletal, functional, or a combination of factors.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize different treatment options for Class II malocclusion defined by proper diagnosis.
- Identify different etiological factors of Class II malocclusion.
- Identify causes of asymmetric Class II malocclusion.

Description:

Structural differences between various classes of malocclusion dictate variation in response to treatment. Research indicates the limitation of common treatment approaches to transform a Class II, division 1 phenotype to a facial pattern with normal skeletal relationships expected with a Class I phenotype. Available data from untreated Class II further support these observations, leading to the consideration of treatment outcome as the cumulative effect of small to moderate changes in skeletal and dentoalveolar components of the malocclusion, rather than a major change in one of these components.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the components mostly involved in defining the severity of the malocclusion.
- Recognize the limitation of treatment in specific Class II malocclusions.
- Determine how change in various components, rather than in one, affected this outcome.

Sat | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Team

1 CE Credit

Aaron D. Molen DDS, MS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Aaron D. Molen DDS, MS
Speaker Has Financial Interest

Description:

Technology marches forward at a relentless pace that can often feel overwhelming.  New advances powering expensive gizmos seem to permeate our inboxes.  Dr. Molen will introduce some of the latest advances in technology occurring outside the orthodontic space and how they impact our profession.  He will share advice on how to navigate these changes in a practical and cost-effective manner.  In a world focused on instant gratification Dr. Molen will try and help you define your technology needs versus wants.


Learning Objectives:

- Describe some of the benefits and drawbacks to integrating 'cutting-edge' technologies.
- Expand their use of non-dental technologies in their offices.
- Recognize new trends in technology and how they'll impact orthodontics.

Sat | 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

33

Topic: Featured Speaker Series

0 CE Credits

Haylie Pomroy BS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Haylie Pomroy BS

Description:

All too often, we as caregivers and medical advocates are stretched thin, stressed out and sleep deprived. Between the demands of high-pressure jobs, of running a business and wading through red tape and insurance hassles, staying healthy, mentally sharp and fully attentive to patients is a struggle. But self-care, listening to your body and not ignoring your metabolism’s own distress calls—such as unexplained weight gain, hair loss, insomnia, anxiety, and low libido—can make your practice more successful and more rewarding. Join bestselling author and renowned nutritionist Haylie Pomroy to learn about the unique health risks facing orthodontists and dental professionals, how to recognize messages your body is sending to you, and how to use nutrition prescriptively to achieve health and wellbeing.


Sat | 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

6A

Topic: Preadolescent Treatment

1.5 CE Credits

Roberto M.A. Lima-Filho DDS, MS | David B. Kennedy BDS, MSD, FRCD(C) | Ildeu Andrade Jr. MS, DDS, PhD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Roberto M.A. Lima-Filho DDS, MS
David B. Kennedy BDS, MSD, FRCD(C)
Ildeu Andrade Jr. MS, DDS, PhD

Description:

The biggest impact on orthodontic therapy is a precise diagnosis. This is the key to success in orthodontic treatment. This lecture will describe treatment concepts that fit the patients’ needs and not the other way around. Also, techniques that achieve the most with the least intervention will be discussed.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize skeletal discrepancies.
- Demonstrate mechanics applied in preadolescent patients.
- Illustrate treatment with minimal intervention.

Description:

This lecture will describe serial extraction and identify its advantages and disadvantages. Tooth movements secondary to serial extraction will be described from recent research. The clinical application of serial extraction will be described with long term case histories. The impact of serial extraction on stability, facial change, treatment time and outcome will be documented with case histories and research findings.


Learning Objectives:

- Describe serial extraction.
- Identify the advantages and disadvantages of serial extraction.
- Describe the impact of of serial extraction on the face, treatment time and treatment complexity.

Description:

The timing of treatment for different malocclusions remains a controversial clinical issue despite the considerable volume of literature on this topic over the past years. Clinical decisions such as the optimal time to start treatment are inevitably difficult, especially in preadolescents, because of the variability between patients, the uncertainty about growth, risk of trauma, psychological needs and treatment response. The purpose of my presentation will be to show when, why and how preadolescence orthodontics should be performed.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify orthodontic problems that can and should be treated prematurely.
- Evaluate how these malocclusions can affect a child’s quality of life.
- Recognize the possible effective and efficient orthodontic solutions in preadolescent orthodontics.

Sat | 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

6B

Topic: Multidisciplinary Care

1.5 CE Credits

Ivo Marek PhD | Colin Richman DMD, CertPerio | Rebecca Bockow DDS, MS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Ivo Marek PhD
Colin Richman DMD, CertPerio
Rebecca Bockow DDS, MS

Description:

The purpose of this lecture is to discuss medical procedure of reconstraction of multiple agenesis. The solution could be rather difficult – including setting up an ideal treatment plan and coordinating the whole treatment process – since several dental disciplines take part in the process of the treatment. Therefore, orthodontic therapy often consists of only adjusting the position of pillars and gaps in the place of agenesis, then the prosthetic reconstruction takes place. The age of the patient and other factors are important when planning the final prosthetic reconstruction. The author analyze the process of treatment plan formation on several cases, then possible complications, which can occur during the treatment, together with consequential modifications. Resolving multiple agenesis is thus based on interdisciplinary co-operation of an orthodontist, prosthodontist and implantologist; in some cases an maxillofacial surgeon can be involved. The authors stress the importance of the therapy coordinator who manages individual phases of the treatment, who bears the responsibility for forming the team, as well as for the treatment results.


Learning Objectives:

- Analyze the process of treatment plan formation.
- Identify the importance of the therapy coordinator.
- Assess the risks and complication associated with inexact treatment plan, bad coordination and changes of patient wishes.

Description:

This innovative periodontal augmentation procedure, combining regenerative periodontal therapy with simultaneous orthodontic treatment, enables the orthodontist to minimize potential iatrogenic risk factors often associated with orthodontic therapy.  Favorably positioned teeth, plus an enhanced muco-gingival complex, facilitates ideal and predictable post treatment esthetics and function.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify iatrogenic risk factors associated with orthodontic therapy.
- Describe etiological issues contributing to these risk factors.
- Prescribe appropriate hard and soft tissue grafting therapies  to minimize the various risk factors, for long term post treatment success.

Description:

Conventional orthodontic tooth movement is restrained by the presence or absence of the surrounding alveolar bone. Combining orthodontics with selective alveolar decortication and bone augmentation increases the thickness of the alveolar trough, allowing for a wider range of tooth movements. Indications for applying this combined technique are derived from goal-oriented treatment planning, specific orthodontic biomechanics and sequencing. Case selection, proposed direction and amount of tooth movement, and treatment timing must be considered in order to achieve the most favorable outcomes with this combined surgical-orthodontic technique.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize how alveolar decortication and bone grafting combined with orthodontics allows for a wider range of tooth movements.
- Illustrate creative ways to design orthodontic biomechanics.
- Coordinate treatment timing and sequencing when utilizing this interdisciplinary treatment plan.

Sat | 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

6C

Topic: Biomechanics

1.5 CE Credits

Steven Jay Bowman DMD, MSD | Richard P. McLaughlin DDS, CertOrtho

Sessions:

Speakers:

Steven Jay Bowman DMD, MSD
Speaker Has Financial Interest
Richard P. McLaughlin DDS, CertOrtho

Description:

Wires and pliers, plastic and punches, scars and solutions, IIs and IIIs, fore and aft, faster and friction, chewies and positioners, quick fixes, horseshoes, monkey hooks, cold steel and sunshine, enhanced anchorage and anchors. Everything from soup-to-nuts: an orthodontic travelogue through daily problem solving as the mother of invention.


Learning Objectives:

- Troubleshoot options for a variety of common clinical issues.
- Evaluate alternatives in treatment planning for several types of malocclusions.
- Evaluate innovative approaches to biomechanics.

Description:

A classification of asymmetries will be presented. Three main categories will be considered which are dentoalveolar, functional and structural/skeletal. Under dentoalveolar asymmetries, anterior, posterior and a combination of the two will be discussed. Under functional asymmetries, cases will be reviewed with functional side shifts from centric relation to centric occlusion. And lastly, structural/skeletal asymmetries in the mandible and the maxilla will be presented. A variety of cases will be diagnosed, treatment planned and a summary of their treatment will be presented.


Learning Objectives:

- Classify asymmetry cases as they present to their office.
- Diagnosis a variety of asymmetry cases.
- Treatment plan asymmetry cases.

Sat | 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

6D

Topic: Class II Correction - Different Approaches

1.5 CE Credits

James A. McNamara DDS, PhD | Yoon-Ah Kook DDS, MSD, PhD | Lysle E. Johnston Jr. DDS, MS

Sessions:

Speakers:

James A. McNamara DDS, PhD
Yoon-Ah Kook DDS, MSD, PhD
Lysle E. Johnston Jr. DDS, MS

Description:

Dr. Jim McNamara has used a wide variety of appliances, both fixed and removable, in the management of patients with Class II occlusal relationships.  His current focus is a prospective clinical study of the Carriere Motion appliance carried out in conjunction with developer of this treatment approach, Dr. Luis Carriere.  The results of this study as well as the specific protocol used will be described in detail.


Learning Objectives:

- Define how the Carriere Motion appliance can be used in the treatment of Class II Malocclusion.
- Manage the skeletal and dental treatment effects produced by the appliance as observed cephalometrically.
- Analyze the details of the Carriere Motion treatment protocol.

Description:

In treatment of class II cases the palatal plate is a highly effective appliance, which can be easily placed and managed by orthodontists. Scientific evidence demonstrated that the application of Modified C-Palatal Plate (MCPP) resulted in successful treatment outcomes by efficient molar distalization with a near-bodily movement. A creative and innovative approach for Class II correction using MCPP will be discussed including biomechanics and practical guidelines. Clinical pearls and a simple management of MCPP including step-by-step placement procedures with use of a jig will be presented.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the indications of the modified C-palatal plate (MCPP) in class II corrections.
- Illustrate the step-by-step chair-side procedures required to incorporate the MCPP in orthodontic practices.
- Recognize the pros and cons of the MCPP and manage maxillary distalization aided by the MCPP with clinical excellence.

Description:

In today’s orthodontic marketplace, a wide variety of Class II treatments jostle for attention, each promising new, improved, and more salable techniques. A pledge to “work with growth” is a common, assuasive rationale. Unfortunately, both for the clinician and the patient, our attempts to grow bone have come to naught and now boil down to making use of whatever the individual pattern of mandibular growth has in store. To this end, all treatments must in some way control the movement of teeth. Therein lies the rub. The canard that people like faces that are stuffed full of teeth commonly leads to an over-reliance on non-extraction treatments and the various “advances” that have served to ratchet the dentition ever more forward. Just as all roads are said to lead to Rome; all roads that lead to well treated Class II malocclusions (that is, results achieved without “blowing” mandibular anchorage) must take a variety of routes to and through the upper dentition. Fixed or functional, early or late, the details are surprisingly similar.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the similarity among the various contemporary Class II treatments.
- Identify treatments whose advertised mode of action is at odds with common sense and contemporary concepts of craniofacial biology.
- Distinguish between practice management decisions and biological imperatives encountered in planning the treatment of Class II malocclusions.

Sat | 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Team

1 CE Credit

Steven P. McEvoy BS, MSc

Sessions:

Speakers:

Steven P. McEvoy BS, MSc
Visually Enhanced Lecture
Speaker Has Financial Interest

Description:

We use computers in many aspects of the Practice on a daily basis, but who hasn’t had a moment where we’ve hated them.  If we understand them a bit, treat them well and just give them a little Love we can achieve even more with them.  During this lecture I will share a variety of ideas to help you 1) Use apps on your phones and tablets to improve what you do on your computer, 2) Make your computer massively faster for under $100, 3) Understand the latest risks and defenses against Ransomware and 4) A few other cool new technology tidbits you can use at home and in the practice. We promise to limit the Geek speak and talk about issues in terms we can all understand. We encourage you to bring your own questions to share.


Learning Objectives:

- Discover SmartDevice apps that can make you more productive at the Practice and at Home.
- Examine the tangible improvements adding a Solid State Hard Drive (SSD) to your computer will make.
- Analyze the latest risks and defenses against Ransomware.

Sat | 2:45 PM - 3:45 PM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Team

1 CE Credit

Gregory J. Jorgensen DMD, MS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Gregory J. Jorgensen DMD, MS

Description:

There are thousands of social media services on the Internet. Which ones are actually important for today's orthodontic practice? How do you go about getting your practice "online" with regards to social media? How do you keep your campaigns going after you're all set up?


Learning Objectives:

- Evaluate the status of their current practice website.
- Interpret the basics of online advertising.
- Define the role that social media and reviews play in new patient acquisition.

Sat | 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

6A

Topic: Preadolescent Treatment

1.5 CE Credits

Ryuzo Kanomi DDS, DDSc, PhD | S. Ed Owens Jr. DDS, MSD | Eustaquio A. Araujo DDS, MDS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Ryuzo Kanomi DDS, DDSc, PhD
S. Ed Owens Jr. DDS, MSD
Eustaquio A. Araujo DDS, MDS

Description:

The need for early treatment has been called into question, and I feel that this has already been well discussed. Nevertheless, there are no arguments that rule out early treatment in specific individual cases. Partial early treatment is not viewed as problematic, for example, in cases of molar crossbite, impacted teeth, or congenitally missing teeth, or in patients with cleft palate or other anomalies. In this lecture, I would like to consider these issues together.


Learning Objectives:

- Consider the role of Gubernacular canal in the occurrence of impacted canine.
- Recognize the possibilities of the skeletal effects of rapid palatal expansion treatment.
- Distinguish the best way to use the face-bow headgear treatment to correct Class II molar relationship.

Description:

As orthodontics has evolved, many opinions have surfaced regarding treatment in the mixed dentition. Demand for orthodontic care has increaded steadily in the new millennium. Contrary to what has been reported in the literature, mixed dentition therapy is common place in practice. This lecture will cover the pros and cons of early intervention as well as case selection, treatment goals, useful mechanics and treated examples.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the advantages and disadvantages of treatment.
- Establish realistic treatment goals for the mixed dentition patient.
- Select treatment mechanics that are practical.

Description:

The dilemma of Class III malocclusions early interventions has not been totally elucidated. Can the principles of Efficacy and Efficiency be respected when dealing with severe Class III malocclusions? Is it possible to control growth for a long period of time? How do Class III individual grow? Many clinicians and researchers are still skeptical about the benefits of an early phase of treatment in Class III individuals. This lecture will introduce evidence, both statistical and clinical, to improve diagnosis and treatment outcomes. There are still many questions to be answered!


Learning Objectives:

- Analyze the outcome of an early Class III treatments.
- Evaluate pros and cons to attempt early Class III treatment.
- Integrate new protocols in clinical practice.

Sat | 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

6B

Topic: Multidisciplinary Care

1.5 CE Credits

Ruangrat Komolpis DDS, MS | Prashant K. Zaveri BDS, MDS (Perio), MDS (Ortho) | Liwia Elzbieta Minch DDS, PhD, MS Ortho, MS Lingual Ortho | Roberto Hernandez-Orsini DMD, MPH, MS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Ruangrat Komolpis DDS, MS
Prashant K. Zaveri BDS, MDS (Perio), MDS (Ortho)
Visually Enhanced Lecture
Liwia Elzbieta Minch DDS, PhD, MS Ortho, MS Lingual Ortho
Roberto Hernandez-Orsini DMD, MPH, MS

Description:

Orthodontic tooth movement can improve certain types of gingival and osseous defects both from periodontal disease and at implant site. In periodontally compromised cases, teeth can be intruded or moved into infrabony defects, leading to probing depth reduction, radiological bone fill, and new clinical attachment formation even in cases with minimal supporting tissue remaining. In patients with soft tissue and osseous deficiencies in implant planning areas, orthodontic extrusion and tooth movement into edentulous area are effective adjunctive orthodontic procedures to develop the implant sites, thus reducing the need for bone graft and gingival graft before implant placement.


Learning Objectives:

- Explain effects of different tooth movement types on periodontal defects.
- Discuss important factors in periodontal healing and stability of new attachments.
- Demonstrate different cases of implant site development.

Description:

High quality finishing for optimum function and esthetics is challenging to an Orthodontist while dealing with a periodontally compromised dentition. It is important to seek succinct understanding of the factors that influence the development and aggravation of periodontal disease superimposed on a malocclusion. Current research has highlighted the cellular and molecular mechanisms that play an important role in tissue destruction and regeneration techniques This coupled with modern diagnostic techniques such as CBCT creates tremendous opportunity for clinicians to engineer and enhance tissue reconstruction and in turn their quality of Orthodontic outcomes. The purpose of this lecture is to discuss trends in tissue rebuilding of teeth supporting tissues while dealing with malocclusions that are complicated by moderate to advanced periodontal destruction and its influence on decision making, treatment planning and treatment outcomes.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify periodontal procedures that can influence orthodontic treatment.
- Identify orthodontic techniques for hard & soft tissue reconstruction and regeneration.
- Implement strategies for Orthodontic/ Periodontic treatment planning with CBCT.

Description:

Orthodontic treatment of adults maintains several specific requirements and one of them is multidisciplinary management. Ageing and very often coexisting diseases can lead to periodontal tissue defects. Orthodontic treatment changes both soft and hard periodontal tissue morphology. Depending on both the planned and performed movement this change can have a positive or harmful influence on the periodontium. Moreover, the fine line between this is sometimes very subtle. The orthodontic movement of teeth beyond the limits of the labial or lingual alveolar bone, inadequate treatment planning or insufficient tooth control can lead to many failures. On the other hand multidisciplinary planning and management and correct orthodontic biomechanics can improve the hard and soft tissue status providing the patient with not only better function but also esthetics.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the capabilities but also the limits of soft tissue remodelling induced by orthodontic treatment.
- Identify the risk factors for recession development.
- Identify the best timing for recession coverage – before, during or after orthodontic treatment.

Description:

Second molar alignment is frequently a challenge in orthodontic treatment, especially in those cases when an adolescent is almost close to complete his/her treatment and second molars are not erupting properly in harmony with the rest of the arch. In this presentation the speaker will present a simple way to align those molars without altering the rest of the arch and therefore, the timing for treatment completion.


Learning Objectives:

- Plan how to align those molars in harmony with the rest of the arch without altering the occlusion or treatment timing for completion.
- Plan ahead simple mechanics to upright those teeth using a conservative approach.
- Comprehend how to properly align and torque those teeth without altering treatment time.

Sat | 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

6C

Topic: Biomechanics

1.5 CE Credits

Antonino G. Secchi DMD, MS | Isao Saito DDS, PhD | Steven J. Lindauer DMD, MDSc | Stephen C. Roehm DDS, MS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Antonino G. Secchi DMD, MS
Speaker Has Financial Interest
Isao Saito DDS, PhD
Steven J. Lindauer DMD, MDSc
Stephen C. Roehm DDS, MS

Description:

Vertical problems such as anterior open bites and or deep overbites can become some of the most difficult cases to treat. Most of the biomechanics in these cases have focused on the wrong movements, either molar intrusion for open bite or incisor intrusion for deep over bite cases, many times using a variety of complicated and invasive auxiliaries. This lecture will demonstrate through clinical cases a simple biomechanics to solve these vertical problems focused on leveling the occlusal plane.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify the role of the occlusal plane in the vertical plane.
- Compare different types of biomechanics to solve vertical problems.
- Manage the most common open bite and deep over bite cases through out leveling the occlusal plane.

Description:

Temporary anchorage devices (TADS) have proposed new and predictable treatment strategies for various types of complicated cases. Of those, remarkable open bite with steep mandible or condylar deformity has been still challenging. A case requiring mandibular molar protraction due to missing molar is also difficult to efficiently attain treatment objectives without remarkable side effects such as mesial rotation and/or inclination. As for the former issue, high mandible open bite cases with or without condylar deformity actually treated along with TADs will be shown. Regarding the latter, effective molar protraction will be discussed based upon an analytic study using 3-dimentional finite element model.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify the efficacy of TADs on severe open bite with steep mandible or condylar deformity.
- Predict treatment outcomes for high mandible open bite using TADs.
- Discuss theoretical and practical mechanics using TADs and side-effects for mandibular molar protraction.

Description:

The focus will be on how to treat patients that present with occlusal cants and also how to correct cants that appear during treatment. Most cants are created inadvertently during fixed appliance therapy and appear unexpectedly. Therefore, the best way to treat an occlusal cant is to prevent its development in the first place. Certain common and recognizable biomechanical geometries require particular caution during the treatment process. Once a cant develops and is detected, simple appliances can be designed and activated to produce the correction desired in a predictable manner.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize common tooth position geometries that will result in development of an occlusal cant if straightwire mechanics are used.
- Manage unfavorable tooth position geometries to align teeth and avoid development of an occlusal cant.
- Design simple appliances to correct occlusal cants that are identified or that develop during orthodontic treatment.

Description:

A difficult and sometimes overlooked procedure in orthodontic treatment is to fabricate a custom arch wire to deliver additional torque. A wire twist does not equate to torque force delivered. Appliance prescription, tooth emergence angle, and desired tooth movement are factors to consider when fabricating a custom arch wire. This lecture will provide the attendee practical information as to how to add the correct amount of wire twist to provide the desired torque. A step by step wire bending format will be used. Each attendee is welcome to bring two orthodontic bending pliers, a marking pen, and an 18 x 25 arch blank. Easy to understand concepts will be demonstrated and the design of a custom fabricated arch wire with the prescribed third order bends will be made.


Learning Objectives:

- Measure and fabricate a custom arch designed to deliver the prescribed torque.
- Recognize prescribed arch wire bending is more accurate and efficient, and eliminates the need for torqueing auxiliaries.
- Demonstrate a better understanding as to how to insert an active third order arch wire.

Sat | 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

6D

Topic: Class II Correction - Different Approaches

1.5 CE Credits

Bernardo Quiroga Souki DDS, MSD, PhD | Lisa A. Alvetro DDS, MSD | Jack Hou DDS, MDS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Bernardo Quiroga Souki DDS, MSD, PhD
Lisa A. Alvetro DDS, MSD
Jack Hou DDS, MDS

Description:

Despite of the fact that nowadays the Herbst appliance is the most frequently used mandibular advancement device in the USA, several clinicians are reluctant to use it. Problems with its management, and doubts on its skeletal effects are the key concerns of many clinicians. Even orthodontists who have been using Herbst appliance have doubts on how to make life easier when dealing with severe Class II/1 malocclusion. In this lecture it will be shared with the audience our experience in the treatment of severe Class II/1 patients with the Herbst appliance, providing tips on how to avoid appliance breakage, soft tissue injuries, less chair time, and a more effective and efficient outcome.


Learning Objectives:

- Distinguish the good responders to an effective and efficient Herbst appliance treatment among Class II malocclusion subjects.
- Identify the most frequent mistakes with the use of Herbst appliance.
- Recognize the possibilities and limitations of the dentoskeletal effects of the Herbst appliance treatment.

Description:

Forsus is a reliable appliance in the treatment of various types of Class II malocclusions. It is independent of patient cooperation, quick to install and easily accepted by patients. However, its biggest advantage is the variable force system that can be created to achieve excellent clinical results. Dr. Alvetro will present various types of Class II malocclusions and how Forsus can be used to obtain successful treatment outcomes.


Learning Objectives:

- Decide when Forsus would be an appropriate choice for Class II correction.
- Identify an ideal force system to optimize treatment outcomes.
- Predict the impact of Forsus on facial esthetics.

Description:

There still remains confusion over the biomechanics and anatomical limitations in correcting the Class II malocclusion. In private practice when treatment starts taking too long or unexpected side effects start showing up there is often little distinction made between patients with poor compliance versus poor diagnosis and unrealistic treatment planning. By exploring the geometry of the Class II correction, it may become more evident how improved treatment planning can minimize patients over treatment time in our practices.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify when the geometry of the Class II correction is reasonable vs. unrealistic.
- Recognize what treatment plans should be considered to achieve a favorable geometry.
- Discuss some techniques that may minimize unwanted side effects in more difficult corrections.

Sat | 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Team

1 CE Credit

Jack Hadley

Sessions:

Speakers:

Jack Hadley
Visually Enhanced Lecture
Speaker Has Financial Interest

Description:

Progressive orthodontic practices use social media marketing to attract new patients, raise top-of-mind awareness and referrals, and strengthen relationships with both patients and referring dentists. But effective social media isn’t something you “have”—it’s something that you “do”! Remarkable, share-worthy social media content helps with your complete digital marketing strategy—including SEO. Social media is no longer an adjunct to some other marketing plan. How do you navigate and benefit from this dynamic environment with the limited amount of time and resources you have to spend on marketing?


Learning Objectives:

- Create the 5 types of content that engage your audiences.
- Demonstrate how social media and reviews affect SEO.
- Modify proven, successful campaigns for use in your own orthodontic practice.

Sun | 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Team

1 CE Credit

Douglas Depew DMD, MS, PC

Sessions:

Speakers:

Douglas Depew DMD, MS, PC

Description:

Generation Z, the next wave of Millennials, are now beginning to enter the workforce. These are the people we will be hiring and working with over the next 10-15 years. It’s imperative that we as doctors, managers, and trainers understand what drives them, how they learn, and how to best use their talents and traits to help our practices thrive. This presentation will reveal surprising results of studies that explain the motives behind their actions, their personality traits, common work ethics, and how to help them be productive employees.


Learning Objectives:

- Distinguish the differences between the various generations.
- Identify the unique traits and characteristics of Generation Z.
- Discuss the management techniques that can help Gen Z employees perform.

Sun | 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

6A

Topic: Evidence

1.5 CE Credits

Thomas Edward Southard DDS, MS | Kyungsup Shin DMD, MS | Steven D. Marshall DDS, MS, MS | Peter Buschang MA, PhD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Thomas Edward Southard DDS, MS
Kyungsup Shin DMD, MS
Steven D. Marshall DDS, MS, MS
Peter Buschang MA, PhD

Description:

Vibrating teeth to accelerate movement, predicting jaw growth from radiographs, curing everything with self-ligating brackets, the list goes on and on and on. Charismatic speakers, seeking fame and fortune, capture an audience and form a movement. Doctors feel left out so they join. Finally, years later, quality research challenges the convictions (and poor research) promoted by these speaker-salesmen who have moved on to new clinical misadventures. Why does this same cycle repeat itself? Why are we so gullible? The purpose of our lecture is to investigate this pattern of behavior and offer solutions to avoid it.


Learning Objectives:

- Discuss a range of orthodontic myths and misconceptions, past and present.
- Employ best evidence to refute false clinical claims.
- Avoid snares laid by charismatic quacks.

Description:

Beliefs without the support of evidence are prejudices. This lecture will introduce various orthodontic prejudices, some are new and some have been around a long time. Clinical beliefs not supported by the literature lead to ineffective and/or inefficient treatments. It will be shown that a number of existing beliefs pertaining to craniofacial growth, the development of malocclusions, post-treatment changes and treatment approaches need to be reconsidered.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify why some treatment approaches to accelerate tooth do not work.
- Identify how and why mandibular orthopedics are possible.
- Identify how skeletal malocclusion develop and why it makes a difference.

Sun | 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

6B

Topic: Cutting Edge Technology

1.5 CE Credits

Chung How Kau BDS, MSc, MBA, PhD, MOrth FDS, FFD, FAMS | Lucia H. Cevidanes DDS, MSD, PhD | Josef Kucera PhD, MUDr | Ching-Chang Ko DDS, MSD, PhD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Chung How Kau BDS, MSc, MBA, PhD, MOrth FDS, FFD, FAMS
Lucia H. Cevidanes DDS, MSD, PhD
Josef Kucera PhD, MUDr
Ching-Chang Ko DDS, MSD, PhD

Description:

Idiopathic condylar resorption is a progressive degenerative disease of the tempromandibular joint (TMJ), most commonly seen in females. This disease can lead to a number of problems in the skeletal and dental complex. Modern technology have allowed the visualization and tracking of the movement of the TMJ in real time. This lecture presents new innovations and a review of bilateral joint replacement techniques.


Learning Objectives:

- Analyze the use of CBCT technology and jaw motion tracking devices.
- Recognize the jaw motion pathways of normal and ICR in real time.
- Review and comment on the use of bilateral condylar replacements and orthodontic treatment.

Description:

This lecture presents an overview of advances in high-resolution 3D imaging, including surface scanners and Cone-Beam CT imaging. Approaches for 3D image capture, image reconstruction, registration, display and measurements are overviewed. The continued growth and integration of technology into our practices is enhanced by the ability of 3D imaging systems to quickly and efficiently capture a dimensional snapshot of our patients’ treatment. It also offers the potential for additional features such as 3D printing. Learning about nontraditional applications will get you ready to take advantage of in depth acumen in diagnosis and treatment planning.


Learning Objectives:

- Demonstrate approaches to 3D image capture, registration, display and measurements.
- Illustrate in depth quick decision of patient treatment needs with 3D imaging.
- Distinguish how 3D imaging has changed our treatment planning.

Description:

The purpose of this lecture is to discuss the controversial issue of long-term stability of orthodontic treatment results. Long-term stability is often considered to be a myth. Therefore, long-term retention with fixed retainers is indicated as one of the approaches to tackle this problem. Fixed retainers, despite many advantages, do have some disadvantages as we may encounter a reasonable number of common complications, such as bond failure or wire fracture. In addition to that, unexpected complications may occur, some with severe manifestations that require orthodontic retreatment and reconstructive periodontal surgery.


Learning Objectives:

- Define the problems that may occur during the retention period.
- Recognize and distinguish the types of unexpected complications of lower fixed retainers.
- Assess the risks associated with unexpected complications and propose necessary treatment.

Description:

Segmentation of 3D craniofacial images is very time consuming. Thus, the current image-based assessment takes years to quantify data from few (~10) patients. Here, we introduced an advanced technique for auto-segmentation of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, which allowed for quantifying maxillary volumes of 30 impacted canine patients and 30 controls within a couple days of computer processing time. The same method was also applied to isolate individual components (e.g., tooth, maxillary process, mandibular body), which were then converted to finite element (FE) models for biomechanical analysis of tooth movement. The tooth movement was measured via clinical trials and the prediction using the individualized image-based FE theorem could answer the questions of the indeterminate biomechanical system. The novel 3D technology in particular will facilitate big data analysis and skyrocket the field of orthodontic biomechanics.


Learning Objectives:

- Introduce the integrate advanced machine learning techniques for auto-segmentation.
- Describe the clinical finding in maxillary volume of patients with impacted canines.
- Describe clinical trials and analyze indeterminate biomechanics of Stage 1 tooth movement.

Sun | 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

6C

Topic: Conventional Anchorage Modalities

1.5 CE Credits

Peerapong Santiwong DDS, PhD | Shannon E. Owens DDS, MS | Weiran Li DDS, PhD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Peerapong Santiwong DDS, PhD
Shannon E. Owens DDS, MS
Weiran Li DDS, PhD

Description:

For decades, the Multiloop Edgewise Archwire (MEAW) technique and its modification has been used for camouflage treatment of mild skeletal Class III malocclusion in patients who do not want to undergo jaw-surgery. However, the success of treatment depends largely on patient compliance in wearing intermaxillary elastics. Therefore, in patients with low compliance, the use of skeletal anchorage has become increasingly popular. In this lecture, various treatment alternatives using modified MEAW and skeletal anchorage for adult Class III patients will be presented and discussed.


Learning Objectives:

- Evaluate the effect of the modified MEAW technique in the camouflage treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusion.
- Evaluate the effect of the skeletal anchorage technique in the camouflage treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusion.
- Compare the treatment outcomes between modified MEAW and skeletal anchorage in adults with skeletal Class III malocclusion.

Description:

This lecture will review historical anchorage concepts from past to present.  Several different cases will be discussed to highlight proper mechanics to enhance anchorage preservation during treatment.


Learning Objectives:

- Define and classify anchorage types.
- Manage treatment mechanics to support anchorage.
- Determine appropriate retention protocols.

Description:

Bimaxillary protrusion is a common malocclusion in Chinese population, and facial esthetics is a major concern of many orthodontic patients. As the increasing communication between eastern and western culture, Chinese population tend to favor straight profiles like Caucasian while neglecting the fact of their unprominent chins. The treatment plan for bimaxillary protrusion often includes extraction of four bilateral premolars, followed by retraction of the anterior teeth with maximum or absolute anchorage to obtain the desired dental and soft-tissue profile changes. However, the movement of tooth is limited by the anatomical margin of alveolar bone. Therefore, the length and position of root, the height and thickness of alveolar bone, and the relationship between root and alveolar bone should be carefully evaluated before orthodontic treatment in order to reduce the potential risks. This lecture aims to discuss the effect and safety of treatment for bimaxillary protrusion by presenting some of my clinical studies and case reports.


Learning Objectives:

- Describe the root relationship to the alveolar bone in bimaxillary protrusion patients.
- Illustrate the factors which affects the esthetic evaluation in bimaxillary protrusion patients.
- Recognize the dangerous of front teeth retraction before orthodontic treatment in bimaxillary protrusion patients.

Sun | 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

6D

Topic: Special Sessions

1.5 CE Credits

William R. Proffit DDS, MS, PhD | Nehi Ogbevoen DDS, CertOrtho | Andrew James Palermo DDS | Sepideh Torkan DDS, MS | Mina Katchooi DDS, MSD

Sessions:

Speakers:

William R. Proffit DDS, MS, PhD
Nehi Ogbevoen DDS, CertOrtho
Andrew James Palermo DDS
Sepideh Torkan DDS, MS
Mina Katchooi DDS, MSD

Description:

Learning from evaluation of clinical outcomes is greatly facilitated by three things that still are often not done: 1) emphasizing clinical significance, not statistical significance. Even with well-done statistics, which usually should not be based on an assumption of random distribution, it really doesn't matter if a finding is statistically significant if its magnitude is so small that changing clinical procedures to obtain this effect would make no practical difference in treatment effectiveness or time, 2) grouping data by problem type, by treatment procedure, and by magnitude of treatment response to show the percentage of patients with minimal, moderate or extreme responses. This is a key to understanding whether findings really are clinically significant and what patients should be told in obtaining informed consent, and 3) reporting data from consecutively treated patients-all of them, no exceptions. Ideally, such data come from a randomized clinical trial, but well-categorized retrospective data are more likely to be available and can be perfectly satisfactory in determining clinical significance. These points will be illustrated with data from selected studies.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify clinical significance upon evaluation of outcomes.
- Group data to understand findings.
- Analyze data to determine its clinical significance.

Description:

Dr. Larry Tadlock will moderate the presentations of two orthodontic graduate programs, USC and UW, on the general topic of minimally invasive accelerated orthodontics. The specific topics are localized micro osteo-perforations (USC) and intraoral vibrations (UW). Each school will have approximately 15 minutes to present the research evidence for and against their respective topics, including a summary and conclusions. There will be some time at the end of the presentations for audience Q&A.


Sun | 8:00 AM - 11:00 AM

SDCC - 33

2.5 CE Credits

Elizabeth Franklin BA, MA | Terry R. Pracht DDS, MS | Joseph Kutyla BA, JD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Elizabeth Franklin BA, MA
Terry R. Pracht DDS, MS
Speaker Has Financial Interest
Joseph Kutyla BA, JD

Description:

At the beginning of your career, your practice venue, your communication skills, your record-keeping practices are just a few of the areas that expose you are to having regulatory complaints or malpractice claims made against you. Do your research regarding potential employment opportunities and exercise defensive practice techniques to protect yourself. This risk management program is designed for the new and nearly new orthodontist to assist you to minimize your malpractice exposure . (All orthodontists will find it applicable). The program is sponsored by the AAO and the AAOIC (RRG).  The speakers will include an orthodontist, a malpractice defense attorney, and an insurance claims manager. All speakers have experience investigating and handling orthodontic malpractice claims. There will be a Q&A session; bring any patient problems from your office to discuss. All AAOIC (RRG) insureds can earn a 10% Professional Liability premium discount by attending this entire session.


Learning Objectives:

- Evaluate different practice venues and their potential exposure to malpractice claims.
- Create detailed and thorough orthodontic records that will minimize exposure to claims and provide maximum defense if one develops.
- Identify aspects of practice that most often result in claim activity and how to manage treatment to successfully navigate through them.

Sun | 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Staff

1 CE Credit

Maria Bailey

Sessions:

Speakers:

Maria Bailey

Description:

A new generation of mothers are quickly becoming the buying power of the mom market.   With more than 73 million Millennials and 2/3 of them expected to have children in the next 5 years, marketers have a huge opportunity to cultivate a lucrative consumer group.  Maria Bailey will provide insights into what motivates these women to purchase goods and services and how you can engage them as a long time customer.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify the motivations of Millennial Mothers in order to craft a marketing message that is relevant and effective in attracting Millennials.
- Establish a digital dialogue with time-starved Millennial Moms in a way that creates a meaningful and long lasting relationship.
- Engage with Millennial Moms in a fashion that will cultivate brand ambassadors.

Sun | 9:45 AM - 11:15 AM

6A

Topic: Evidence

1.5 CE Credits

Carlos Flores-Mir DDS, DSc, FRCDC | Greg J. Huang DMD, MSD, MPH | Sanjivan Kandasamy BDSc, BScDent, GradDipClinDent, DocClinDent, MOrthRCS, FRACDS, FDS RCS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Carlos Flores-Mir DDS, DSc, FRCDC
Speaker Has Financial Interest
Greg J. Huang DMD, MSD, MPH
Speaker Has Financial Interest
Sanjivan Kandasamy BDSc, BScDent, GradDipClinDent, DocClinDent, MOrthRCS, FRACDS, FDS RCS

Description:

Simplified complex evidence-based concepts for day-to-day orthodontic practice through clinical cases.


Learning Objectives:

- Discard the use of p-value as sole measurement of study clinical impact and to focus on the confidence interval as the real clinical relevant information.
- Apply diagnostic concepts to select the best available diagnostic/screening test.
- Discern the real clinical relevance of the significance of the portrayed differences as implied in published/unpublished studies or commercial advertising.

Description:

The national adult anterior openbite study has recruited over 100 orthodontists and around 300 subjects.  This lecture will describe the practitioners' and subjects' characteristics, the practitioners' recommendations, and the patients’ accepted plans.  It will also describe relationships that affect recommendations and treatment.  For instance, do recommendations vary based on when a practitioner completed his or her orthodontic training, and are patients with more severe skeletal characteristics more likely to accept surgical treatment?  Additionally, this lecture will briefly mention the goals of the next two phases of the study - end of treatment success and long-term stability.


Learning Objectives:

- Describe the characteristics of the orthodontists participating in the National Adult Anterior Openbite Study.
- Describe the characteristics of the patients participating in the National Adult Anterior Openbite Study.
- Discuss how practitioner and patient characteristics affect the treatments that are recommended, as well as the treatments that are chosen.

Description:

There is no doubt technology has significantly improved how we do things in clinical orthodontic practice. Have these new technologies however made a difference in how we diagnose and treat our patients? Has slick marketing over exaggerated the actual value of these new toys? This lecture puts orthodontic toys in to perspective using the contemporary evidence based information.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify the importance of objectively evaluating new technology in terms of effectiveness and efficiency.
- Recognize the difference between marketing hype versus evidence when considering the incorporation of new technology in clinical practice.
- Demonstrate importance of identifying real outcome benefits in terms of improved treatment outcomes and/or genuine patient benefit with the incorporation of new technology.

Sun | 9:45 AM - 11:15 AM

6B

Topic: Cutting Edge Technology

1.5 CE Credits

Leslie A. Will DMD, MSD | Sunil Kapila BDS, MS, PhD | Nikhilesh R. Vaid BDS, MDS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Leslie A. Will DMD, MSD
Sunil Kapila BDS, MS, PhD
Nikhilesh R. Vaid BDS, MDS

Description:

Orthodontists have relied heavily on cephalometric analysis, although shortcomings of using linear and angular measurements are well known. A new area of analysis, which examines the shape of objects, has been increasingly used to help clinicians determine more accurate diagnoses as well as identify factors that contribute to treatment outcomes. This presentation will describe how shape analysis is done, and give some examples of how it is currently used in orthodontic diagnosis.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the shortcomings of linear and angular cephalometric measurements and recognize the value of shape analysis.
- Identify the steps in shape analysis.
- Describe clinical situations where shape analysis can be helpful.

Description:

Advances in computer, imaging and biomedical technologies are being rapidly integrated into orthodontics to deliver increasingly customized therapy, enhance treatment efficiency, and launch the era of “precision orthodontics.” These enhancements have facilitated the launching of the era of “precision orthodontics.” The goal of this presentation is to highlight advances in computer technologies and biomedicine that have direct applications to precision orthodontics. Advances in computer hardware and software, and 3D imaging technologies offer the ability for customized 3D treatment and biomechanical planning. These technologies combined with 3D printing are already being applied to customized appliance fabrication in the form of aligners and retainers. The prospect for custom fabrication of orthodontic brackets of appropriate material properties is a highly desirable and compelling goal that appears to be increasingly plausible. Within biomedicine, the biomodulation of cartilage growth and bone biology is currently being tested to modify mandibular growth and modulate tooth movement, respectively. It is conceivable that such discoveries will ultimately have clinical applications in orthodontics. Given these evolutions, precision orthodontics is expected to become part of the repertoire in providing customized, effective and efficient orthodontic treatment to our patients in the not too distant future.


Learning Objectives:

- Outline the optimized utilization of 3D imaging in diagnosis, treatment and biomechanic planning.
- Assess the efficacy of current and emerging novel methods to expedite tooth movement.
- Deduce the convergence of technology and biomedicine in delivering efficient and effective precision orthodontics.

Description:

The "tap and swipe" culture has touched every sphere of our lives. Orthodontics has embraced technology wholeheartedly,and this infusion has altered the face of our diagnostic, mechano-therapeutic, appliance design, didactic and management protocols. The physical forms of most orthodontic entities are slowly but surely being replaced by digital and cloud applications that are 'up in the air', and have altered the dynamics of the 'orthodontic experience'.


Learning Objectives:

- Classify the applications of technolgy in contemporary orthodontics.
- Assess Patient and Clinician knowledge, perceptions and preferences on use of specific technology applications in orthodontics.
- Critically analyze and relate to futuristic applications of technology that can potentially change the face of orthodontic care.

Sun | 9:45 AM - 11:15 AM

6C

Topic: Conventional Anchorage Modalities

1.5 CE Credits

Mauro Cozzani DMD, MScD | Jose A. Bosio BDS, MS | Tian Min Xu DDS, PhD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Mauro Cozzani DMD, MScD
Jose A. Bosio BDS, MS
Visually Enhanced Lecture
Tian Min Xu DDS, PhD
Speaker Has Financial Interest

Description:

Tooth three-dimensional control during space closure and case refinement will be demonstrated through several clinical cases; the technique biomechanical rationale will be explained through a quick review of the history of orthodontics; the scientific evidences that support the procedures will be presented, critically assessed and discussed; finally some conclusions on the subject will be drawn.


Learning Objectives:

- Perform tooth 3D control.
- Manage asymmetric space closure.
- Recognize when traditional anchorage and or TADs should be utilized.

Description:

Most dentists have tackled the dilemma of treating patients missing one or both maxillary lateral incisors. The anchorage requirement depends on the choice of treatment. This program will provide a review of the current proposed forms of treatment for cases missing one or both maxillary lateral incisors and discuss anchorage consideration for the treatment alternatives. Clinical situations will illustrate the variability in the decision process.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the incidence of missing maxillary lateral incisors.
- Correlate the significance of congenitally missing lateral incisors to the whole dentition.
- Assess ideal anchorage requirements for treating patients missing maxillary lateral incisors.

Description:

Upper molar tipping forward with growth has been verified by study data of several craniofacial growth centers in US, Canada and China. From anchorage control perspective, a tipback moment of 24 hours during whole treatment period is certainly beneficial to preventing this kind of physiologic anchorage loss. That expends anchorage control concept from dealing with reaction force of appliance to all source of forces including growth force, masticatory force etc. This lecture will introduce a new strategy of anchorage control and its clinical application.


Learning Objectives:

- Define the mechanism of Physiologic Anchorage Loss.
- Identify how to prevent Physiologic Anchorage Loss and its effects on whole anchorage control.
- Distinguish the significance of Physiologic Anchorage Control on anchorage preservation.

Sun | 9:45 AM - 11:15 AM

6D

Topic: Interdisciplinary Treatment

1.5 CE Credits

Mark N. Hochman DDS, CertOrtho | Ute Schneider-Moser DDS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Mark N. Hochman DDS, CertOrtho
Ute Schneider-Moser DDS

Description:

Orthodontic tooth movement remains as one of the most predictable options to regenerating and improving osseous and soft tissue deficiencies in the esthetic zone today. This lecture will focus on the biologic principals that form the clinical basis to understanding how and why tooth movement provides advantages to regeneration of both hard and soft tissue structures prior to implant placement. The pros and cons of using such an adjunctive therapy to assist in these corrections will be discussed in detail.


Learning Objectives:

- Evaluate how interdisciplinary dental treatment requires knowledge of both periodontal and orthodontic concepts to be successful.
- Recognize the basic biologic principles of regeneration of osseous and soft tissues structures when using orthodontic treatment.
- Determine when adjunctive orthodontic therapy should be employed.

Description:

For patients with agenesis of one or both maxillary lateral incisor/s the question whether orthodontic space closure with extensive recontouring of the six anterior teeth by a combination of grinding and veneering is preferable to space opening and implant-borne crowns has not been answered yet. Less favorable long-term esthetic and periodontal outcomes have been reported for implant-supported crowns and thus the pendulum has swung towards the space closure side. The authors will present the outcome of two clinical studies with consecutively treated patients of their private office and critically discuss them not only in the context of the existing orthodontic literature, but including relevant interdisciplinary scientific evidence on the topic as well.


Learning Objectives:

- Evaluate the pros and cons of either orthodontic space closure or implant-borne crowns replacing congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors from different interdisciplinary standpoints.
- Appreciate the impact of the latest developments in periodontics, implantology and prosthodontics on the esthetic and periodontal outcome of single-tooth implants in the anterior maxilla.
- Understand the importance of mutual decision making in the treatment planning process for patients with agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors.

Sun | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Staff

1 CE Credit

Chris Bentson BS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Chris Bentson BS
Speaker Has Financial Interest

Description:

Results for the solo and small group practice were very strong in 2016 and doctor-owners are looking to build on that in 2017. With many forces pushing and pulling to change the shape of dentistry, facts on the current market will be presented offering doctor-owners the knowledge to make necessary strategic decisions. In addition to presenting up-to-date orthodontic market data, this lecture will identify the major pressures the specialty is facing. Chief among these changes is consolidation in dentistry, which is occurring at an accelerated pace. As a result and to remain relevant and competitive, the owners of solo and small group practices need to increase their level of business sophistication. This lecture will present how currently available practice analytic tools can be used to help a practice stay competitive and grow. Chris will review current trends in partnering with other orthodontists or pediatric dentists, as well as, how economic and generational trends are affecting practice owners. His presentation will equip you with data needed to stay competitive and make strategic decisions about the future of your practice.


Learning Objectives:

- Compare their practice expenses to industry norms.
- Explain the current disruptions affecting the specialty.
- Outline specific take home objectives to implement in their practice, in order to remain relevant and competitive in the present environment.

Sun | 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

33

Topic: Featured Speaker Series

0 CE Credits

Lee Woodruff BA

Sessions:

Speakers:

Lee Woodruff BA

Description:

Whether it’s a child in a car accident, a spouse’s request for a divorce, a patient’s stroke, a diagnosis of breast cancer, or a terrorist attack on a warm day in September -- life can change in an instant for us all. As co-author of In An Instant, the #1 New York Times best seller, Lee Woodruff recounts her story of a marriage, a family, a crisis and a healing. When her husband, ABC’s newly appointed co-anchor Bob Woodruff, was hit by a roadside bomb while covering the war in Iraq, Woodruff’s life changed in an instant. She had to learn to put her own grief aside to care for her children as well as her husband, who was gravely injured and close to death. In the words of Bishop Desmond Tutu, "Suffering is not optional. It seems to be part and parcel of the human condition, but suffering can embitter or ennoble." Woodruff speaks with grace and humor about her own family’s experience and how they chose to attack the crisis that befell them, resulting in a life-changing journey of love, healing and miracles for her whole family.


Sun | 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

6A

Topic: Accelerated Tooth Movement

1.5 CE Credits

Su Jung Kim DDS, MSD, PhD | Juihui Jiang MS Ortho, PhD | Dauro Douglas Oliveira DDS, MS, PhD | Dawei Liu DDS, MS, PhD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Su Jung Kim DDS, MSD, PhD
Juihui Jiang MS Ortho, PhD
Dauro Douglas Oliveira DDS, MS, PhD
Dawei Liu DDS, MS, PhD

Description:

It is a challenge for orthodontists to move the teeth efficiently into the atrophic alveolar ridge accompanied by periodontal improvement, especially in adult patients. In order to overcome this clinical limitation, adjunctive surgical procedures targeting the atrophic alveolar bone like cortical activation, ridge splitting, and ridge augmentation have been developed. When surgical stress reaches the periodontal tissues, active wound healing process is evoked to induce regional acceleratory phenomenon favorable for subsequent tooth movement. Based on understanding the healing mechanism of different type of surgical procedures, we orthodontists should control the surgically-assisted tooth movement in a timely manner. This lecture will suggest to you a clinical pearl of how to maximize the effect of surgically-assisted orthodontics, aiming at our patients’ healing of life with healing of periodontium.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify the effect and the limitation of surgically-assisted tooth movement into atrophic alveolar ridge.
- Recognize the significance wound healing process in relation to efficient tooth movement accompanied by tissue regeneration on the atrophic ridge.
- Perform surgically-assisted tooth movement efficiently according to different type of surgical procedures.

Description:

A prospected clinical trial was conducted followed by several clinic studies and also basic research works. We tried to answer the following five questions based on evidence. Question 1. Does decortication-facilitated orthodontic treatment really speed the treatment procedure and how fast is it? Question 2. For the orthodontic treatment, does decortication-facilitated orthodontic treatment save the anchorage? Question 3. If the tooth move faster, is there the risk more root resorption will occur? Question 4. What has happened if the tooth move faster- the Miro-CT study? Question 5. Why the tooth move faster during the decortication-facilitated orthodontic treatment-the experimental animal study? Some news have been put forward, such as, anchorage saving, two peaks of osteoclast counts and so on.


Learning Objectives:

- Analyze whether or not the decortication-facilitated orthodontic treatment really speed the treatment procedure and how fast it is.
- Analyze whether or not the decortication-facilitated orthodontic treatment could save the anchorage.
- Analyze whether or not the decortication-facilitated orthodontic treatment has more risk of root resorption during treatment because of faster tooth movement.

Description:

A number of different clinical approaches have been used to try to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). The amount of invasiveness required to effectively increase OTM rate and how they affect the patients’ quality of life remain unclear. This lecture will present results from a RCT that compared the effects of Regional Alveolar Corticotomies and Piezocision to accelerate OTM in adult patients.


Learning Objectives:

- Discuss whether Corticotomies or Piezocision are more effective in accelerating orthodontic tooth movement.
- Compare the effects of Regional Corticotomies and Piezocision on the quality of life of the orthodontic patients.
- Identify how these procedures could be routinely used in an orthodontic office.

Description:

One of the big challenges in clinical orthodontics is the long treatment time that usually associates with side effects such as iatrogenic root resorption, white spot lesions, poor oral hygiene and compromised compliance. Therefore shortening the overall treatment time becomes a highly significant task for orthodontists. The overall orthodontic treatment time is determined by both biological (e.g. alveolar bone resorption leading to tooth movement) and non-biological (e.g. orthodontic appliance, mechanics and patient’s compliance) factors. Biologically, orthodontic tooth movement is a mechanically-induced modeling and remodeling of periodontium. To move teeth faster, historically several means had been explored e.g. local injection of biomolecules such as PGE2, herb extracts, and RANKL protein and gene construct. In recent years a surgical procedure - periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics (PAOO) has been applied to help move teeth fast by increasing the regional turnover rate of bone (so called regional acceleratory phenomenon - RAP). Unfortunately, none of these has been efficaciously translated to clinical application mainly due to their invasiveness and surgical complications. More recently, two non-invasive methods i.e. low energy level of laser or LED and mechanical vibration have been proposed and applied to help move teeth faster, however with no support of solid scientific evidence. On the non-biological side, appliance selection, biomechanical considerations and patient’s compliance all contribute to the overall treatment time. In this presentation, all the currently available evidence for accelerating orthodontic treatment will be reviewed with regard specifically to their rationales, pros and cons, clinical applicability, effectiveness and efficacies.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the factors contributing to the orthodontic treatment time.
- Compare the concepts and methods proposed to accelerate orthodontic treatment.
- Evaluate the rationales, pros and cons, clinical applicability, effectiveness and efficacies of these methods.

Sun | 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

6B

Topic: Finishing

1.5 CE Credits

Chia-Tze Kao DDS, MMS, PhD | Andre J. Horn CertOrtho, CertDental | Antonio Gracco DDS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Chia-Tze Kao DDS, MMS, PhD
Andre J. Horn CertOrtho, CertDental
Antonio Gracco DDS

Description:

The skeletal class III malocclusion population takes around 5-8% population in Taiwan. The current orthodontic treatment on the class III malocclusion includes extraction the teeth, applying the temporary anchorage device (TAD) and functional muscle training. Revising the outcome of class III malocclusion treatment, if the class III malocclusion is dental origin without skeletal discrepancy, post treatment results are acceptable. But in some cases treatment, patient may achieve acceptable occlusion but still poor esthetic. In such a case, the treatment plan should combine orthodontic with orthganthic surgery treatment. The orthognathic surgery technique includes apical osteotomy, Maxilla Lefort I, bilateral sagittal split or vertical ramus osteotomy and genioplasty. After the orthodontist and oral surgeon team works, the esthetic outcome may show there is still a room for improving esthetics to be a better result. This lecture is going to discuss what are the orthodontists should know on the cosmetic problem and provide the better esthetic information to the patient.


Learning Objectives:

- Define the skeletal class III or mandible prognathism or maxilla retrognathism, identify the diagnosis of skeletal problem.
- Determine the orthodontic and orthognathic surgery method started from the end of the outcome.
- Illustrate orthognathic surgery case which combined with plastic surgery outcome.

Description:

We want to demonstrate that finishing, is not in it itself, the last step of a treatment. Finishing is the result of a long series of arch wires that has taken place all through the treatment process. First the diagnosis, treatment strategy and treatment control in torque, tip and in-out bends. Second, we must respect the limits of the denture; Anterior, Mid and Posterior arch areas. Importance is also given to the arch form that should be maintained for stability. Finishing and stability depend on functional occlusion; an overcorrection of the malocclusion is the key to a successful, esthetic and functional occlusion. Finally, a word on our optimism regarding orthodontic treatments : as mentioned when I started off, finishing is not a long, calm river.


Learning Objectives:

- Discuss and describe what we understand by finishing an orthodontics treatment.
- Analyze the treatment steps involved in finishing.
- Analyze the process and technique behind the last arch-wires in finishing.

Description:

Occlusal finishing is a major concern in orthodontic treatment. The clinician may often have to place orthodontic finishing bends and reposition brackets in order to obtain an ideal detailed occlusion. Finishing procedures diminished with the introduction of customized techniques since the orthodontist can see the final result before the start of treatment using a manual or digital setup. Some systems also allow the orthodontist to perform corrections virtually; in other cases, however, only technicians can develop the setup. As of customized techniques, the complete bracket engagement is of great importance. To this end, the clinician must be familiar with the types of wires that can be used in the lingual technique in order to improve the final position of the tooth. In the last stage of the orthodontic treatment it may be necessary to correct the arches by making finishing bends that allow for better aesthetics, occlusion, periodontal health, root alignment and stability. Careful attention should be paid to the different biomechanics applied to the buccal and lingual technique.


Learning Objectives:

- Evaluate which steps need to be taken during the digital setup in order to obtain an ideal finishing.
- Define the critical aspects of customized lingual and buccal technique that need to be evaluated in order to achieve an ideal occlusion.
- Define the ideal corrections to be used in order to detail the final result, i.e. supplemental correction archwires, aligners with setup, archwires with multiple finishing bends.

Sun | 1:15 PM - 2:15 PM

6C

Topic: Potpourri / Clinical

1 CE Credit

Christodoulos Laspos DDS, MDS | Renato Parsekian Martins DDS, MS, PhD | Timothy G. Shaughnessy DDS, MS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Christodoulos Laspos DDS, MDS
Renato Parsekian Martins DDS, MS, PhD
Timothy G. Shaughnessy DDS, MS

Description:

The term “orthopedics” has a precise application in the treatment of infants with cleft lip and palate. Presurgical infant orthopedics was introduced in the mid 50s as an early therapy for the correction of cleft lip and palate deformities. Nasoalveolar molding represents an evolution of the original technique introduced and popularized by the NYU TEAM. Infants with cleft lip and palate present with displaced nasal tip, depressed alar dome, skewed columella, displaced labial frenum, orbicularis oris that runs up into nose and deformed alveolus. Nasoalveolar Molding (NAM) is used to correct the form and position of the nasal cartilages, premaxilla, and alveolar ridges during the neonatal period (first week till 3-4months of age). It is also used to elongate the collumella in infants with bilateral cleft lip and palate. The appliance is made of wire and acrylic nasal stents attached to an intraoral acrylic plate. In effect, this presurgical management of the cleft infant is intended to reduce severity of the oronasal deformity prior to surgery. This technique takes advantage of the malleability of immature nasal cartilage and its ability to maintain a permanent correction of its form due to the high levels of hyaluronic acid. This is performed by gradual elongation of the nasal stents and the application of forces that are applied to the lip the nose and the alveolar segments. Utilization of the NAM technique has eliminated surgical scars associated with traditional columella reconstruction, has reduced the number and cost of surgical procedures, and has become the standard of care in many Cleft Palate Centers. This lecture will present step by step the utilization of this technique as well as the advantages and disadvantages in the management of individuals born with cleft lip and palate.


Learning Objectives:

- Determine when is NAM necessary.
- Identify what is NAM focusing on.
- Outline the advantages of using NAM.

Description:

Even though very few technological advancements have occurred in orthodontics in recent years, the search for more efficient treatment has not stopped. This lecture aims to analyze in a logical manner how one of longest phases of orthodontic treatment can be improved. The leveling of a deep curve of Spee can be joint into the alignment phase, through a method called Early Vertical Correction (EVC). This technique comprises the addition of two cantilevers to the initial flexible wire, in order to start the treatment of the vertical relationship as early as possible.  The force system produced is described and discussed, as well as how to control the side effects of this technique. Using the EVC, treatment time can be decreased in cases with deep curve of Spee since two phases of the orthodontic treatment which are normally undertaken necessarily one after another could occur at the same time.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify the rationale behind the use of early vertical correction in order to decrease treatment time.
- Distinguish the mechanics behind early vertical correction from that of conventional straightwire.
- Apply vertical correction clinically.

Description:

Fixed retainers are effective in maintaining the alignment of the anterior teeth more than 90% of the time, but they can produce inadvertent tooth movement that that in the most severe instances requires orthodontic retreatment managed with a periodontist. This type of unexpected and unwanted tooth movement is different from relapse into crowding when a fixed retainer is lost. These problems arise when a retainer breaks but remains bonded to some or all of the teeth, or when an intact retainer is distorted by function or was not passive when bonded. In both instances, torque of the affected teeth is the predominant outcome. Highly flexible twist wires bonded to all of the teeth appear to be the most likely to produce inadvertent tooth movement, but this also can occur with stiffer wires bonded only to the canines. Numerous examples of inadvertent tooth movement with fixed lingual retainers will be shown, along with a discussion of the most likely causes, suggestions for prevention, and supervision of patients during retention.


Learning Objectives:

- Distinguish the different types of inadvertant tooth movement that can be produced by the various fixed retainer designs and wire types.
- Propose the most likely causes of inadvertant tooth movement with fixed ligual retainers.
- Discuss the best methods for prevention of fixed retainer problems and supervision of patients during retention.

Sun | 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

6D

Topic: Vertical Control / Facial Esthetics

1.5 CE Credits

Elie W. Amm DDS, CertOrtho | Seo-Ye Im DDS, PhD | Eric J.W. Liou DDS, MS | Joseph Bouserhal DDS, MDS, DURCO, DUOLG, DUIT

Sessions:

Speakers:

Elie W. Amm DDS, CertOrtho
Seo-Ye Im DDS, PhD
Eric J.W. Liou DDS, MS
Joseph Bouserhal DDS, MDS, DURCO, DUOLG, DUIT

Description:

Facial esthetics is one of the primary goals in orthodontics. Maintaining a good profile and improving a disharmonious one is almost an ethical obligation. In an effort to stream line and optimize our workflow, we have sacrificed personalized treatments in our busy practices. Moreover, social media is changing the norms of beauty and this has unfortunately trickled down to our own scientific literature.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the potential of orthodontics in changing patients' profile.
- Recognize the relationship between the vertical control, lower incisors and facial esthetics.
- Perform an on-the-go differential diagnosis.

Description:

The goal for all orthodontic treatment plans must include a pre-determined posttreatment smile line. To this end, precise analysis of the individuals’ skeletofacial and soft tissue conditions is necessary. Also, among deep overbite patients, facial, skeletal and soft tissue parameters show varying conditions. The treatment plans, therefore, must reflect variability. This lecture will strive to offer some treatment approaches for the deep overbite patient.


Learning Objectives:

- Distinguish the difference in assessing the FMA values among Asians and westerners.
- Discuss the treatment plan options for high/low angled deep overbite cases using fixed appliances.
- Recognize the influencing factors contributing to the posttreatment stability of deep overbite correction.

Description:

Contemporary orthodontics focuses mostly on the anteroposterior anchorage control but seldom on the vertical control for facial esthetics. Dentofacial deformities such as, excessive or inadequate upper gingiva and incisor show, uneven gingival line due to occlusal canting, and excessive or inadequate chin projection in adult patients have not been well addressed yet in orthodontics, although these problems could be solved surgically. The aim of this presentation is to present the orthodontic mechanisms and techniques with/without TADs for the vertical control of anterior and posterior teeth, smile arc, upper gingival line, and chin projection for achieving a reasonable facial esthetic improvement without orthognathic surgery. These include the orthodontic mechanisms of intrusion/extrusion of upper/lower dentitions with TADs, upward/downward rotation of mandible for the control of chin projection with TADs, and the correction of occlusal cant with yin-yang archwires without TADs.


Learning Objectives:

- Manage the excessive/inadequate gummy smile and incisor show through non-surgical orthodontic approaches.
- Access to the orthodontic devices and mechanics for increasing or decreasing chin projection without surgery.
- Perform the orthodontic mechanism of yin-yang archwires for the correction of occlusal cant without orthognathic surgery or TADs.

Description:

Smile esthetics is considered as the main objective to fulfill during our orthodontic treatment. In handling our patient’s problem list, we ask frequently ourselves 1) do we have to consider the incisor position ONLY in the sagittal plane or more and more in the vertical and, 2) should we have to apply a SYSTEMIZED treatment approach or must we INDIVIDUALIZE our treatment planning? Our orthodontic philosophy has to consider the initial vertical position of upper and lower incisors at rest and during smiling in order to set up individualized treatment objectives and to attain the best final esthetic result. Therefore, we have to apply individualized mechanics depending on facial growth pattern, occlusal plane inclination and smile line position.


Learning Objectives:

- Establish an individualized diagnosis based on the different components of the face.
- Apply an appropriate treatment planning according to smile esthetics need.
- Apply individualized mechanics depending on facial growth pattern, occlusal plane inclination and smile line position.

Sun | 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Team

1 CE Credit

Jonathan R. Martin CPA

Sessions:

Speakers:

Jonathan R. Martin CPA

Description:

Dental partnerships sometimes get a bad rap. Almost every dentist knows someone who has been in a partnership that ultimately failed for some reason, leading many to overlook or dismiss what can be a very lucrative and fulfilling business model.  For every failed partnership, there is a long-standing, harmonious partnership that provides its owners with numerous benefits, both quantitative and qualitative.  It is due to these benefits and many recent industry trends that we have seen a steep increase in the number of partnerships.  In this presentation, we will discuss the pros and cons of this sometimes polarizing business model, and will explore ways that doctors considering this path can achieve success by avoiding common pitfalls.


Learning Objectives:

- Discuss the reasons that partnerships are a growing trend, and why more and more doctors are choosing this pathway for their transition over a full sale of the entire practice.
- Identify the qualitative issues that sellers should consider before pursuing a partnership, such as facility and capacity issues, how long should your buyer work as an associate, what percentage of the practice should be sold, etc.
- Outline the steps that are necessary, and identify the financial terms that must be addressed in order to achieve a successful partnership including the amount of income growth necessary to sustain multiple doctors, sale structure and the resulting tax implications for each party, the allocation of income and expenses between partners, etc.

Sun | 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM

6C

Topic: Awards Lectures

2 CE Credits

David L. Turpin DDS, MSD | Thomas J. Cangialosi DDS, CertOrtho | Peter M. Greco DMD | Eladio DeLeon Jr. DMD, MS

Sessions:

Speakers:

David L. Turpin DDS, MSD
Thomas J. Cangialosi DDS, CertOrtho
Peter M. Greco DMD
Eladio DeLeon Jr. DMD, MS

Description:

With designation as an orthodontic specialist, we have inherited the need to know how to acquire, evaluate and disseminate scientific facts. From the beginning we have accepted this challenge, but the mechanisms by which we acquire, assess, and transfer knowledge have changed considerably over the past century. In this presentation, I will relate the use of evidence to the current practice of orthodontics and will suggest how we can evaluate the effectiveness of “faster treatment” promotions. Do you have access to the evidence needed to assure your next patient they are really benefiting from the latest technological finding? Or is it more mythical than scientific? While much of the information mentioned will be familiar to our recently trained orthodontists, those of us graduating more than 15 years ago have witnessed a real revolution in producing, accessing, and utilizing orthodontic literature.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize whether or not faster treatment techniques have achieved significance.
- Demonstrate how to search and evaluate follow-up studies to determine whether or not the high bar of clinical significance is reached.
- Determine if the latest technique to speed treatment become productive in their office.

Description:

This presentation will include a discussion of the orthodontic and surgical treatment planning for patients with clefts of the face, lip and palate. There will also be a discussion of the treatment of patients with craniofacial syndromes which may cause malocclusion, facial distortion and facial imbalance. Orthodontic preparation for different types of unique surgical and orthopedic procedures will be discussed. A series of case reports will also be presented which illustrate the manifestations of several of these syndromes and how they can be managed.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the orofacial manifestations of Crouzon, Apert and Treacher Collins syndromes as well as Sickle cell disease.
- Assess the potential benefits of pre-surgical orthopedic treatment before surgical closure of complete clefts of the lip and palate.
- Assess and determine the appropriate tooth movement necessary prior to orthognathic surgery for a variety of craniofacial syndromes.

Description:

This lecture will explore the increasingly difficult conundrum of the two premier players in our specialty: the practicing orthodontist and the orthodontic educator. The modern orthodontist is placed in the difficult position of providing optimal care while managing a profitable business entity. The orthodontic educator is faced with inspiring and teaching the latest generation of our specialty, despite decrease in faculty availability and departmental funding. The entire specialty finds that as the competition for patient availability increases, the respect for our legacy of integrity and trust—our professionalism--becomes challenged. This lecture will explore these dilemmas.


Learning Objectives:

- Define the “perfect storm” that tests our profession’s ethical heritage more than ever.
- Develop an appreciation for the dilemmas facing orthodontic educators.
- Reflect on several suggestions that are aimed toward resolution of these issues.

Sun | 2:30 PM - 4:00 PM

SDCC -

1.5 CE Credits

Chris Bentson BS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Chris Bentson BS
Visually Enhanced Lecture
Speaker Has Financial Interest

Description:

This program is focused to orthodontists newly in practice and to orthodontic residents. At this moment in the history of the specialty, many forces are at work causing uncertainty about the best strategy for success as an orthodontist begins his or her career.  This lecture will examine the present orthodontic market and traditional practice options.  A discussion about disruption in dentistry and how their effect on the orthodontic market in the future.  Finally, a look at the various paths new and younger orthodontists can take based on this data will be offered.  The future is bright for new and younger doctors, and this lecture will shed light  on the many different pathways for a successful career path at a time of great change.


Learning Objectives:

- Analyze current financial and operational benchmarks so they can measure a practice they own or want to purchase against these norms.
- Evaluate new opportunities that exist today for employment as a career in the specialty.
- Comprehend the forces of change at play in the specialty and career options that can succeed.

Sun | 2:45 PM - 3:45 PM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Team

1 CE Credit

Darryl Davis CSP

Sessions:

Speakers:

Darryl Davis CSP
Speaker Has Financial Interest

Description:

In today’s world, life can be STRESSFUL, and because of that, it’s important not only to know how to deal with stress, but how to move through it and get to the other side. In this fast paced seminar, Darryl gives a comical and entertaining way for attendees of all levels of experience to have more joy and less stress in their lives. Based on the book with the same title, this session is full of stories and inspiring messages to help give people hope, even excitement, about the opportunities that exist for them in their future. You will leave this seminar with less stress, focused, and motivated to start being in action in your life.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify causes of stress in your life.
- Evaluate negative influences and how to deal with them.
- Demonstrate techniques in keeping a positive mental attitude.

Sun | 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

6A

Topic: Accelerated Tooth Movement

1.5 CE Credits

Mani Alikhani DMD, MS, PhD | Eiji Tanaka DDS, PhD | Nan E. Hatch DMD, PhD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Mani Alikhani DMD, MS, PhD
Speaker Has Financial Interest
Eiji Tanaka DDS, PhD
Visually Enhanced Lecture
Nan E. Hatch DMD, PhD

Description:

In the era of accelerated orthodontics, vibration and micro-osteoperforations (MOPs) are two popular techniques. However, while the mechanism of action and effectiveness of micro-osteoperforation has been studied extensively, there is little or even contradictory data when it comes to vibration. Our research at CTOR has shown that both MOPs and vibration have many features in common – they both can accelerate the rate of tooth movement (catabolic effect) and stimulate bone formation (anabolic effect). In this presentation, the mechanism of action of both MOPs and vibration will be reviewed, and we will discuss conditions under which both stimulants can have a catabolic effect and therefore accelerate tooth movement. Furthermore, we will discuss the anabolic effect of both stimulants and how they broaden the horizons of orthopedic treatment. Finally, we will demonstrate how to incorporate these new scientific findings into the clinicians’ daily practice to improve treatment efficiency.


Learning Objectives:

- Define the biphasic theory of tooth movement and catabolic and anabolic effects.
- Identify the mechanism of action of vibration.
- Compare the biological effects of micro-osteoperforation with that of vibration.

Description:

The rate of orthodontic tooth movement is mainly determined by the remodeling of tissues surrounding the roots. This indicates the importance of the control of molecular mechanisms regulating cellular behaviors in the alveolar bone and periodontal ligament. Currently surgical and non-surgical methods for the acceleration of orthodontic tooth movement have been developed, and one of the potential non-invasive approaches is low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS). LIPUS can improve the rate of bone healing after trauma and fracture and a number of studies have tried to understand its biological effects in regard to the osteoblastic and osteoclastic responses. In this lecture, the introduction of LIPUS has made it possible for orthodontists to accelerate tooth movement and thereby to shorten the duration of orthodontic treatment.


Learning Objectives:

- Evaluate the molecular mechanisms of accelerated orthodontic tooth movement.
- Recognize the effectiveness of LIPUS on orthodontic tooth movement.
- Apply the LIPUS in clinical orthodontic treatment.

Description:

Orthodontists and their patients desire orthodontic treatment efficiency. One way to enhance treatment efficiency is to speed up tooth movement. Many adjunctive treatment options are in development and/or currently available which potentially enhance tooth movement. Do these treatments work? Do they work in all patients? Are there negative side effects? Do physiologic limits exist? These questions and more will be addressed in this lecture.


Learning Objectives:

- Describe how and if biologic mediators (drugs) can be used to increase the rate of tooth movement.
- Describe how and if vibration appliances can be used to increase the rate of tooth movement.
- Describe how and if vibration appliances can be used to enhance orthodontic retention.

Sun | 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

6B

Topic: Finishing

1.5 CE Credits

Ronald L. Gallerano DDS, MSD | Anoop Sondhi DDS, MS | Marissa Chu Keesler DDS, MS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Ronald L. Gallerano DDS, MSD
Visually Enhanced Lecture
Anoop Sondhi DDS, MS
Marissa Chu Keesler DDS, MS

Description:

Having witnessed a profession that has transitioned from all bands to mostly all bonds, from "straight bracket" to "straight wire,”from hand tracings and manual measurements to digital, and delays of multiple days or weeks to immediate viewing of pre-treatment records, how have finishing techniques changed?  This lecture will focus on techniques that have been successfully used in my private practice to strive for ABO quality finishes as a routine goal, but unfortunately, not a routine result.  Techniques that have worked and those that have failed will be presented.


Learning Objectives:

- Determine when to begin the finishing procedures.
- Recognize tooth positions that “settle” well, and those that don’t, and what to do to enhance those situations.
- Identify when to say “go” and when to say “no’ to an appliance removal.

Description:

The effect of anterior interferences on occlusal dysfunctions will be discussed. Five specific clinical sequela will be identified, and their clinical implications in orthodontic treatment will be reviewed. Finally, we will review the possible control of anterior interferences during fixed appliance mechanics.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the presence of anterior interferences.
- Identify appropriate procedures to remove anterior interferences during the finishing phases of orthodontic treatment.
- Manage orthodontic procedures to avoid anterior interferences.

Description:

Without a doubt, many orthodontists frequently struggle during the finishing stage of treatment to obtain that perfectly ideal occlusion and desirable smile for their patients. Certainly, if there could only be a way to constantly achieve the finishing goals everyone desires, this would not only yield satisfied patients, but also reduce treatment time. Consistent great results spring from a treatment approach that keeps the end result in mind, and the clinician’s solid confidence in the art of finishing.


Learning Objectives:

- Define true ideal from non-ideal results.
- Perform excellent finished cases stress-free without the aid of expensive equipment.
- Identify how to achieve excellent esthetic and occlusal results in a consistent manner.

Sun | 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

6D

Topic: Class III

1.5 CE Credits

LiLi Chen DDS, PhD | Patrick K. Turley DDS, MSD, MEd | Peter Ngan DMD

Sessions:

Speakers:

LiLi Chen DDS, PhD
Patrick K. Turley DDS, MSD, MEd
Peter Ngan DMD

Description:

Patients with a skeletal Class III malocclusion always complain of an unharmonious profile and poor biting of their occlusion. It is well documented that these patients typically suffer from low confidence and even self-contempt, which affects their mental and social well-being. This lecture will report the results of various techniques applied as possible solutions. A group of patients with Class III malocclusion and Mandibular protrusion were treated by MEAW technique, Transmission technique or Implant technique.


Learning Objectives:

- Analyze the pathogenesis of Skeletal Class III malocclusion, to illustrate the latest advances in the treatment of Skeletal Class III malocclusion.
- Compare the advantages and disadvantages of different treatment methods.
- Perform a multiplier satisfaction of appearance and function for Skeletal Class III malocclusion after optimal choice of treatment methods.

Description:

Facemask therapy has been said to be ineffective after the age of eight with tooth movement outweighing orthopedic changes. This lecture will discuss studies that have examined this question as well as presenting cases illustrating the effectiveness of treatment in older children. The use and action of facemask therapy in non-growing individuals will also be discussed.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify differences in facemask therapy among different age groups.
- Identify cases ideally suited for facemask therapy.
- Describe the action of facemask therapy in non growing individuals.

Description:

This lecture will address the stability of early Class III treatment. The age factor, growth pattern, excessive mandibular and asymmetric mandibular growth that affects the stability of treatment will be discussed. Long-term treatment records will be presented to illustrate the importance of growth after early orthopedic treatment.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify the factors that affect the stability of early Class III treatment.
- Determine the type of Class III malocclusion that will warrant early treatment.
- Determine if retention is necessary for early Class III treatment.

Sun | 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Team

1 CE Credit

Kayla Hoorelbeke MBA

Sessions:

Speakers:

Kayla Hoorelbeke MBA
Speaker Has Financial Interest

Description:

In the New Patient Process, it’s not all about reaching cruising altitude. The “takeoff” leading up to the exam and the “descent” following the exam are just as important towards your sales success, and ultimately marketing your practice. Buckle up as we discuss the marketing and sales keys to execute an optimal New Patient Exam, how you can make an impact even after the start appointment, and which crewmembers in your practice play a role during these stages of the process.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify the pre- and post-exam stages of the New Patient Process.
- Evaluate your intake process to maximize sales and marketing opportunities prior to the New Patient Exam.
- Recognize the importance of the start appointment and treatment follow up towards internal marketing to promote future production.

Mon | 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Team

1 CE Credit

Eric J. Ploumis DMD, JD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Eric J. Ploumis DMD, JD

Description:

Market forces have radically altered the way we run our practices. Excessive student loan debt, increased competition from non-specialists, an uncertain economy, and the encroachment of corporate dentistry have put pressure on both the junior and senior orthodontist. This lecture will examine those market forces from a legal and economic standpoint and help us understand, address, and adapt to these “megatrends.”


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the forces that are changing the nature of our practices.
- Analyze how these trends impact our practices.
- Identify the steps we need to take to harness those forces to our advantage.

Mon | 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

6A

Topic: Prevention / White Spots

1.5 CE Credits

Michael Knoesel Prof. | Roberto Justus DDS, MSD | Eser Tufekci DDS, MS, PhD, MSHA

Sessions:

Speakers:

Michael Knoesel Prof.
Speaker Has Financial Interest
Roberto Justus DDS, MSD
Eser Tufekci DDS, MS, PhD, MSHA

Description:

While fixed orthodontic treatment has been providing the basis for non-compliant, routine orthodontic treatment of large parts of populations since decades, one of its downsides includes an increased incidence of enamel decalcification and cavitations. It is common knowledge that preventive measures are frequently associated with additional costs. The aim of this lecture is to also make clinicians aware of potential long-term follow-up costs that may result from ongoing treatment need of post-orthodontic cavitations and esthetically relevant white-spot lesions. Advantages and disadvantages of two strategies suitable to address this undesired side-effect are balanced: Lingual fixed treatment as an approach to reduce post-orthodontic decalcification and to minimize follow-up costs caused by long-term enamel damage treatment; and micro-invasive infiltration as a strategy to treat decalcifications during or following fixed orthodontic treatment.


Learning Objectives:

- Balance advantages and disadvantages of labial and lingual multi-bracket treatments in terms of enamel decalcification.
- Inform their patients about potential follow-up costs that may result from ongoing treatment need of post-orthodontic decalcifications.
- Balance advantages and disadvantages of micro-invasive infiltration during or following multi-bracket treatments.

Description:

Orthodontic treatment success is jeopardized by the risk of development of white spot lesions (WSLs) around orthodontic brackets. Unfortunately, the formation of WSLs still remains a common complication during treatment in patients with poor oral hygiene. Nearly 75% of orthodontic patients are reported to develop enamel decalcification because of prolonged plaque retention around brackets. It is the orthodontist’s responsibility to minimize the risk of patients having enamel decalcifications as a consequence of orthodontic treatment. This can be achieved by using fluoride-releasing, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) to bond brackets, with deproteinization of the enamel surface prior to phosphoric acid etching.


Learning Objectives:

- Describe the incidence of new WSLs at the completion of orthodontic treatment.
- Explain why the enamel surfaces surrounding the bracket bases are protected from WSLs when brackets are bonded with RMGICs.
- Describe why enamel deproteinization with Clorox (5.25% Sodium Hypochlorite), prior to etching, increases bracket SBS, diminishing bracket bond failure incidence, both with composite resin and with RMGIC (Justus et al, Seminars in Orthodontics, March 2010).

Description:

The development of white spot lesions is a risk associated with orthodontic treatment in patients with poor oral hygiene. This lecture will discuss the findings of a randomized controlled clinical trial on the durability of a fluoride releasing sealant in orthodontic patients.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the role of the orthodontist, general dentist and the patient in promoting and maintaining adequate oral hygiene.
- Identify various methods of fluoride delivery systems to help minimize white spot lesions during orthodontic treatment.
- Identify a basic practice protocol for prevention of white spot lesions.

Mon | 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

6B

Topic: Anchorage Modalities

1.5 CE Credits

Sarandeep S. Huja DDS, CertOrtho | Kortne King Frederick Hou DDS, MDS | Jason B. Cope DDS, PhD, FACD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Sarandeep S. Huja DDS, CertOrtho
Kortne King Frederick Hou DDS, MDS
Jason B. Cope DDS, PhD, FACD
Speaker Has Financial Interest

Description:

Both skeletal anchors (SA) and expedited tooth movement (ETM) are at the forefront of innovations in clinical orthodontics. While intraalveolar SA have been used extensively, one major advantage of extraalveolar SA is the possibility of enmasse movements without the anchor interfering and being in the path of tooth movement. Failure rates of SA, the ability to provide anchorage for different dental and skeletal orthodontic applications vary widely between intra and extra alveolar SA. Similarly, there is conflicting information on efficacy of expedited tooth movement. The central question that we need to answers is whether there is adequate clinical evidence to support methods to ETM.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify the key differences between intraalveolar and extraalveolar SA.
- Identify factors in the bone physiology that relate to failure of intraalveolar and extraalveolar SA and rate of tooth movement.
- Assist clinicians in understanding choices of SA.

Description:

You just meet a parent and child and have only a few minutes to make a first impression and discuss the child’s treatment. Is discussing a surgical procedure carrying additional cost, appointments and potential risks really the most appealing option for an adolescent? TADs definitely have their place in orthodontics, as absolute anchorage, especially in non-growing patients or when compliance is poor. At least consider the lower cost, elimination of additional appointments, and minimally invasiveness of a more traditional approach to anchorage with headgear and lower arch anchorage preparation. No-one thought the fashions of the late 80s would make a comeback… what’s old is new again, and it still works.


Learning Objectives:

- Evaluate cost to your practice for different types of anchorage.
- Consider cost to your patient for different types of anchorage.
- Determine how you will preserve anchorage into your practice.

Description:

A difficult tooth movement to consistently and reproducibly accomplish without anchorage loss is lower molar protraction. This presentation will outline several of the common methods employed to protract lower molars along with their side effects. Dr. Cope will also present a biomechanically sound miniscrew-based treatment option for protracting lower molars.


Learning Objectives:

- Appreciate the various mechanical options for molar protraction.
- Analyze the potential clinical side effects associated with molar protraction.
- Evaluate the clinical appropriateness of molar protraction in individual cases.

Mon | 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

6C

Topic: Retention

1.5 CE Credits

Simon J. Littlewood BDS, FDS(Orth)RCPS, MOrthRCS, FDSRCSEng, MDSc | Chris L. Cramer DDS, MS, MBA | Joseph Varghese BDS, MS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Simon J. Littlewood BDS, FDS(Orth)RCPS, MOrthRCS, FDSRCSEng, MDSc
Chris L. Cramer DDS, MS, MBA
Joseph Varghese BDS, MS

Description:

As more high-quality research becomes available, we are learning more about the best evidence-based approach to retaining our orthodontic results. This lecture will share views on the current best evidence to support our retention regimen as well as information on how new technologies are helping to improve our clinical practice in the crucial field.


Learning Objectives:

- Discuss the most recent high quality evidence for retention.
- Identify new technology being used to place bonded retainers.
- Recognize safe use of retainers.

Description:

A split-mouth dog study determined how micro-osteoperforations (MOPs) placed using the PROPEL Device affect tooth movements and bone when premolars are retracted into an extraction site. MOPs were applied to the experimental side premolar only with the contralateral premolar serving as a control side. Measured outcomes included tooth movements, histology, bone turnover, bone density, and bone volume. The results and the clinical conclusions drawn from them will be reviewed.


Learning Objectives:

- Discuss the expected rate of orthodontic tooth movement with standard orthodontic techniques.
- Discuss the effects seen on bone and tooth movement in a dog model following placement of micro-osteoperforations with the PROPEL Device.

Description:

Whether individual orthodontic cases can be viewed as successful or not needs to be evaluated by the stability of treatment results. Numerous factors affecting stability are under the control of the orthodontist. The establishment of a functional and stable post-treatment occlusion should be a primary objective of orthodontic treatment. This is a clinical presentation with case reports and discussion of factors affecting post-treatment relapse from a clinical standpoint as well as description of a retention protocol for long-term stability.


Learning Objectives:

- Determine the most common problems in orthodontic retention.
- Distinguish the most important factors which provide for long-term stability of orthodontic results from a clinical perspective.
- Identify a good retention protocol to maintain the finished orthodontic results for long-term stability.

Mon | 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

6D

Topic: TMD

1.5 CE Credits

Jeffrey C. Nickel DMD, MS, PhD | Laura R. Iwasaki DDS, MS, PhD | Robert L. Kaspers BA, DDS, MS | Paul H. Rigali Jr. DDS, CertOrtho | Matthew J. Cozin DDS, MS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Jeffrey C. Nickel DMD, MS, PhD
Speaker Has Financial Interest
Laura R. Iwasaki DDS, MS, PhD
Robert L. Kaspers BA, DDS, MS
Paul H. Rigali Jr. DDS, CertOrtho
Matthew J. Cozin DDS, MS

Description:

We are using ecologically valid approaches to understand why some temporomandibular joints (TMJ) break-down and others do not. These approaches combine measurements to attain a “mechanobehavioral score” that assesses TMJ health and predicts potential for degenerative change and repair. The knowledge from this work should eventually lead to specific evidence-based preventive and therapeutic management strategies for TMD.


Learning Objectives:

- Define component factors that contribute to mechanobehavioral scores and how these are measured for personalized TMJ assessment.
- Distinguish differences between sub-groups of people with and without temporomandibular disorders.
- Evaluate technologies for characterizing jaw mechanics and behaviors.

Description:

3D technology can provide the orthodontist a more accurate diagnosis than 2D radiographs. Dr. Kaspers will show the key to structural diagnosis-- the Five Condylar Positions. He will show the clinician how to evaluate your orthodontic cases in all three dimensions (anterior-posterior, transverse, and vertical).


Learning Objectives:

- Identify the key to structural diagnosis – the Five Condylar Positions.
- Explain why you cannot find centric relation in 40% of your cases without using a CBCT.
- Explain when and how to change the morphology of the temporomandibular joint so you can achieve a seated condylar position.

Description:

Idiopathic Osteoarthritis of the TMJ's occurs in about 20% of adolescent orthodontic patients. Most of these patients are asymptomatic! In about 50% of patients demonstrating hard tissue changes of the TMJ's, growth of the facial skeleton will also be affected. As practicing orthodontists we need to be aware of which patients are at risk and what are the signs that may indicate that a problem may exist that would preclude normal orthodontic treatment results. This lecture will highlight the signs of IOA of the TMJ's using routine orthodontic records as well as 3D imaging (CBCT). It will also help to identify when the orthodontist should delay the initiation of orthodontic treatment until the TMJ's become more stable.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify possible growth changes to the facial skeleton secondary to IOA of the TMJ's using routine 2D radiographs.
- Identify and distinguish the different stages of IOA of the TMJ's on CBCT scans.
- Differentiate between stable vs unstable TMJ's in order to manage the timing orthodontic treatment.

Description:

The role of environmental and local factors in determination of mandibular length is unknown, but the balance between bone formation and resorption during development likely influences mandibular length. The lecture will review the results found in two murine models where osteoclast function is inhibited. The data presented will lay the foundation for future experiments to further understand the role of osteoclasts in determination of mandibular length.


Learning Objectives:

- Interpret how osteoclast function is inhibited in the two mouse models described.
- Recognize the importance of bone metabolism in proper development of mandibular growth.

Mon | 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Team

1 CE Credit

Laurance E. Jerrold DDS, JD, ABO

Sessions:

Speakers:

Laurance E. Jerrold DDS, JD, ABO

Description:

Practicing contemporary orthodontics is a wonderful and rewarding career and all members of the team provide a valuable service.  However, there are risk management concerns that are encountered by every team member.  This presentation will cover a myriad of examples that describe the ways in which all members of the orthodontic team expose themselves to legal liability.  The examples include both administrative and clinical errors and the risk management techniques that can be employed to minimize the potential exposure.  The information is applicable to all members of the orthodontic team: front desk personnel, treatment coordinators, chairside assistants, and doctors.  Questions from the participants will be accepted as they come up during the presentation.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the most common tasks, procedures and errors that potentially expose orthodontic team members to litigation and liability.
- Utilize various risk management tools and techniques to minimize legal exposure both in the administrative and clinical venues.
- Apply the information gleaned to the individual character and operation of their practices immediately upon returning to work.

Mon | 9:45 AM - 11:15 AM

6A

Topic: Self-Ligation

1.5 CE Credits

Frank A. Bogdan Jr. BS, DMD | Paula Zabalegui DDS, MS | Kai-Woh Loh BDS, MDS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Frank A. Bogdan Jr. BS, DMD
Paula Zabalegui DDS, MS
Kai-Woh Loh BDS, MDS

Description:

The lecture will focus on how my experience in PSL has evolved over the last 20 years and in turn how my thought process has evolved too. It is clear to me now that the lighter we get with our forces the more dramatic the dental alveolar and tissue response becomes when friction is reduced. This presentation will include a series of adult cases that are Class III skeletal and cases with severe maxillary constriction and crossbite, both types of which were considered to be of a surgical nature. Each of the cases respond to light force, dental alveolar modeling using primarily 2-3 oz. elastics with significantly shortened treatment time. Relative stability will be illustrated in retention.


Learning Objectives:

- Assess the common denominator in these ‘Surgical’ Class III patients that will allow you to differentiate these cases from true skeletal Class III problems.
- Diagnose and manage these type of cases with confidence and treat them efficiency.
- Analyze the impact muscles have on the treatment with PSL vs Conventional.

Description:

Condylar displacement following orthognathic surgery has been related to post-surgical relapse. Although postoperative changes in condylar position have been reported in previous studies, no study has precisely quantified these variations in three dimensions (3D). The development of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has enabled the accurate measurement of changes in condylar position in three planes of space (x, y, z).


Learning Objectives:

- Identify in 3 planes of space the different condylar movements that occur during orthognathic surgery which cannot be seen in conventional 2D imaging.
- Analyze condylar rotation and translation movements and how these will affect the stability and prognosis of your surgical cases.
- Illustrate a method to precisely quantify condylar movements in 3 dimensions.

Description:

Treatment plan for modern day orthodontic treatment should be focused on facial result as desired by the patients. It is no longer sufficient just to have straight teeth. Straight teeth achieved by orthodontic treatment must be in harmony with a beautiful face and facial profile. Avoidance of extraction of teeth during orthodontic treatment is often desired as no patient like to have good teeth removed. A low force and low friction technique is recommended. This can be achieved by using self-ligating brackets which encourages alveolar bone growth. With alveolar bone growth, the dental arch can be widened to relieve dental crowding.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize that we may be removing too many teeth for the correction of crowding.
- Demonstrate the technique that is used to reduce extraction in crowded cases.
- Identify which are the cases that cannot be treated by non extraction.

Mon | 9:45 AM - 11:15 AM

6B

Topic: Anchorage Modalities

1.5 CE Credits

Jae Hyun Park DMD, MSD, MS, PhD | Sebastian Baumgaertel DMD, MSD, FRCD(C) | Chris H. Chang DDS, PhD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Jae Hyun Park DMD, MSD, MS, PhD
Sebastian Baumgaertel DMD, MSD, FRCD(C)
Chris H. Chang DDS, PhD
Visually Enhanced Lecture

Description:

Temporary anchorage devices (TADs) are currently being used to mesialize molars into edentulous areas. Recently, with the development of the orthodontic miniscrew, there have been reports of the orthodontic closure of space caused by missing mandibular first molars or second premolars. These treatments were more difficult to conduct on mandibles, where the bone is denser than that in the maxilla. Because the space from a missing first molar or deciduous second molar is large, the third molar is often considered a substitute for these missing teeth. In this lecture, vertical eruption patterns of impacted mandibular third molars after the mesialization of second molars using miniscrews will be discussed.


Learning Objectives:

- Discuss clinical applications and biomechanical considerations during molar protraction with TADs.
- Describe factors affecting vertical eruption of impacted third molars after mesialization of second molars.
- Evaluate whether impacted third molars vertically erupt better after mesialization of second molars.

Description:

Through detailed anatomical studies, Dr. Baumgaertel has identified some phenomenal areas to place orthodontic miniscrews with tremendous success, while other areas are absolutely unsuitable. Using such sites will drive up the failure rates of miniscrews. In this highly dynamic lecture you will learn to identify areas for miniscrew insertion with high probability outcomes – the ‘Target Sites’ and the science behind them. Dr. Baumgaertel will further present biomechanical concepts that will provide maximum versatility so these sites can be used for the majority of indications.


Learning Objectives:

- Describe anatomical makeup of ‘Target Sites’.
- Identify high probability areas for miniscrew insertion.
- Design different biomechanical systems for various orthodontic problems.

Description:

Extra-radicular screw placement addresses one of the main challenges of inter-radicular screw placement, that is root interference during a large scale of tooth movement. This lecture will provide application examples of extra-radicular screws in treating sagittal and vertical problems as well as impactions.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify appropriate screw insertion sites according to the corresponding types of malocclusions.
- Describe the function of a 3-D lever arm in the force system for impaction treatment.
- Compare the difference between inter-radicular screw placement versus extra-radicular screw placement.

Mon | 9:45 AM - 11:15 AM

6C

Topic: Biomechanics

1.5 CE Credits

Flavio A. Uribe DDS, MDentSc | Branislav Vidovic DDS, MDS | Ravindra Nanda BDS, MDS, PhD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Flavio A. Uribe DDS, MDentSc
Branislav Vidovic DDS, MDS
Ravindra Nanda BDS, MDS, PhD

Description:

The use of TADs may be associated to anchorage control and possible facilitation of orthodontic mechanics. However, this is not often the case as the desired effects are sometimes not achieved or often counteracted by significant side effects. Adequate knowledge of biomechanics enables the delivery of forces and moments that can be used in a plethora of clinical problems. The application of force systems that enable to maximize the desired effects on tooth movement while minimizing the side effects is of primary importance.


Learning Objectives:

- Describe the one couple system or cantilever system delivered from TADs and its significant versatility.
- Outline different biomechanical approaches delivered from TADs for the correction of moderate to severe problems in the vertical dimension.
- Illustrate how TADs can maximize the mechanics delivered with Invisalign.

Description:

The lecture will encompass the analysis of facial softtissues changes following orthodontic treatments. Soft tissue profile changes are assessed with respect to dental and skeletal structure changes in order to determine what kind of mutual connection there is between them and how that connection can be used to efficiently manage dental structures in orthodontic treatment not only for the purposes of achieving optimal occlusal relationships but also in the sense of achieving a balanced facial appearance.


Learning Objectives:

- Define the most important skeletal and dental structures which influence soft tissue profile changes.
- Analyze the intensity and direction of the mutual connections between dental and skeletal structure changes.
- Illustrate dental and skeletal changes on the basis of obtained clinical practice results by comparing treated cases.

Description:

There has been considerable interest in Orthodontics to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement and treatment time in the last few years. Most of the attention in this area has been to develop mechanical devices or various surgical interventions to accelerate treatment. This lecture will show with case presentations simple biomechanics based appliances and wires to correct unilateral and bilateral Class II molar relationships, canted occlusal planes and dental midline discrepancies in a timely manner and without side effects. Correction of side effects created with poorly designed mechanics are often the  biggest culprits in extending the treatment time.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize some common side effects which may extend treatment time.
- Interpret application of biomechanics based wires to correct various dental malocclusions.
- Distinguish various appliances to correct specific problems.

Mon | 9:45 AM - 11:15 AM

6D

Topic: Management of Impacted/Missing Teeth

1.5 CE Credits

Steven D. Harrison DDS, MS | William M. Northway DDS, MS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Steven D. Harrison DDS, MS
William M. Northway DDS, MS

Description:

This lecture will involve a comprehensive review of the literature on impaction management with specific emphasis on obtaining the most predictable and esthetic outcome for the patient. Several cases will be presented and the decision process that was made in the management process. Different surgical techniques will be presented and the rationale for the different approaches utilized.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize different esthetic compromises in impaction management.
- Improve the clinician’s ability to improve these esthetic compromises.
- Identify the most difficult of impactions and their management.

Description:

When treating congenitally missing upper laterals (C.M.U.L.) there are many options that will improve both the patient’s appearance and function.  But is there ONE best option for the majority of CMUL patients?  This presentation will carefully review specific factors that might help decide whether the implant approach or the canine conversion approach is best suited for specific cases.  While the orthodontist is often the leader of the treatment team for CMUL patients, it is very important that the preferences of the patient, the parent(s) and all of the members of the treatment team are fully considered and implemented in the development of the ultimate treatment plan.  Once that “unified” plan is undertaken procedures can be coordinated, maximizing the efficiency of care.  This presentation will illustrate systems that will make it easier to keep the interdisciplinary measures on track.  It will also introduce detailed orthodontic steps that can facilitate and achieve the desired pre-restorative clinical result that allows an outcome which exquisitely camouflages CMULs. This lecture, heavily inspired by Bjorn Zachrisson, will provide insights and options that orthodontists might have overlooked in managing the care of CMUL patients.


Learning Objectives:

- Appreciate the importance of getting all parties on board.
- Incorporate a broader array of elements that make for an exquisite result.
- Employ a broader perspective of the considerations involved in taking the best approach.

Mon | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Team

1 CE Credit

Chris Bentson BS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Chris Bentson BS
Speaker Has Financial Interest

Description:

Results for the solo and small group practice were very strong in 2016 and doctor-owners are looking to build on that in 2017. With many forces pushing and pulling to change the shape of dentistry, facts on the current market will be presented offering doctor-owners the knowledge to make necessary strategic decisions. In addition to presenting up-to-date orthodontic market data, this lecture will identify the major pressures the specialty is facing. Chief among these changes is consolidation in dentistry, which is occurring at an accelerated pace. As a result and to remain relevant and competitive, the owners of solo and small group practices need to increase their level of business sophistication. This lecture will present how currently available practice analytic tools can be used to help a practice stay competitive and grow. Chris will review current trends in partnering with other orthodontists or pediatric dentists, as well as, how economic and generational trends are affecting practice owners. His presentation will equip you with data needed to stay competitive and make strategic decisions about the future of your practice.


Learning Objectives:

- Compare their practice expenses to industry norms.
- Explain the current disruptions affecting the specialty.
- Outline specific take home objectives to implement in their practice, in order to remain relevant and competitive in the present environment.

Mon | 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

33

Topic: Featured Speaker Series

0 CE Credits

Darryl Davis CSP

Sessions:

Speakers:

Darryl Davis CSP

Description:

In today’s world, life can be STRESSFUL, and because of that, it’s important not only to know how to deal with stress, but how to move through it and get to the other side. In this fast paced seminar, Darryl gives a comical and entertaining way for attendees of all levels of experience to have more joy and less stress in their lives. Based on the book with the same title, this session is full of stories and inspiring messages to help give people hope, even excitement, about the opportunities that exist for them in their future. You will leave this seminar with less stress, focused, and motivated to start being in action in your life.


Mon | 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

6A

Topic: Potpourri / Clinical

1.5 CE Credits

Holland Maness BS, DMD, CertOrtho | Fouad-Hassan Ebrahim DDS, MSc | Bhavna Shroff DDS, MDS, MPA | Dennis M. Ward BS, DDS, MSD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Holland Maness BS, DMD, CertOrtho
Fouad-Hassan Ebrahim DDS, MSc
Bhavna Shroff DDS, MDS, MPA
Dennis M. Ward BS, DDS, MSD

Description:

In this lecture, Dr. Maness draws on her distinct experiences as a dual certified Orthodontist and Forensic Odontologist to share interesting cases, her experiences as well as to discuss challenges in the field of forensics. The American Board of Forensic Odontology has at present 90 board certified members. She hopes to inspire this passion and work in others.


Learning Objectives:

- Explain the medicolegal rational for forensic odontology.
- Recognize the scope of forensic odontology and the odontogist's role in the medical examiner's office.
- Identify a path forward for those interested in the field.

Description:

Although CBCT has been widely used to investigate the cortical structure of various anatomical structures in the maxillofacial region, the use of CBCT to image trabecular bone in the past has been very limited. With recent advances in imaging technology, imaging of the trabecular component of bone is now possible. This presentation will answer the questions: Can CBCT imaging accurately assess trabecular bone of the mandibular condyle as compared to high resolution micro-CT? What trabecular bone properties can be accurately assessed using CBCT and do they have potential to aid in the early diagnosis of TMJ osteoarthritis?


Learning Objectives:

- Demonstrate that CBCT can image various trabecular bone parameters as compared to micro-CT.
- Identify various parameters that can be accurately assessed using CBCT and which of these may be used as potential radiographic biomarkers for TMJ osteoarthritis.
- Comprehend the limitation of using CBCT to image trabecular bone.

Description:

This lecture will explore the biomechanics of erupting impacted canines and provide strategies to control and minimize side effects. The presentation will include a discussion on the type of canine exposure to maximize the periodontal health and esthetic outcomes.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify the appropriate appliance design to erupt impacted canines.
- Predict the force system and minimize the side effects of the system used.
- Choose the preferred surgical procedure when referring for canine exposure.

Description:

The lecture will explore the relationship between the dentoalveloar complex and facial esthetics. Specifically, orthdontic treatment decisions and their relationship with the integumental oro-facial complex will be discussed. A brief historical perspective will be presented and our responsibilities as orthodontists will be highlighted. Particular attention will be given to expansion of the dental arches and the subsequent effect on the esthetics of the facial complex.


Learning Objectives:

- Incorporate time tested facial analyses into their diagnostic regimen.
- Recognize the need for a differential diagnosis when treatment planning.
- Visualize facial compromises when choosing treatment mechanics.

Mon | 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

6B

Topic: Root Resorption

1.5 CE Credits

W. Eugene Roberts DDS, PhD | Adrian Becker BDS, LDS, DDO | Stella Chaushu DMD, MSc, PhD

Sessions:

Speakers:

W. Eugene Roberts DDS, PhD
Adrian Becker BDS, LDS, DDO
Stella Chaushu DMD, MSc, PhD

Description:

Despite a relatively low force to deflection rate for initial archwires, the highest risk for external apical root resorption (EAAR) is during the first 6 months of treatment (initial alignment). Relative to biomechanics, the major risk factors for EARR are genetic predisposition, occlusal trauma, root flexure, PDL inflammation and cell necrosis.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the role of PDL necrosis in the biomechanics of applied loads.
- Analyze the relationship between occlusal trauma and root flexure.
- Compare the interactive biomechanics of PDL necrosis, occlusal trauma, and root flexure on the expression of root resorption.

Description:

The principal aim of the presentation is to bring Invasive Cervical Root Resorption and Pre-eruptive Intracoronal Resorption to the attention of orthodontists who, for the most part, are unaware of their existence and hence of their importance. Orthodontics and surgery have been cited as etiologic factors for ICRR. Each condition has a direct bearing on the ability to achieve orthodontic movement, on the success of treatment and on the prognosis of these teeth.


Learning Objectives:

- Define six different manifestions of resorption related to impacted teeth.
- Describe Invasive Cervical Root Resorption (ICRR) and Pre-eruptive Intra-coronal Resorption (PEIR).
- Propose multidisciplinary treatment in the presence of ICRR and PEIR.

Mon | 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

6C

Topic: Craniofacial Care / Special Needs

1.5 CE Credits

Timothy Scott Trulove DMD, MS | Sylvia A. Frazier-Bowers DDS, PhD | Somchai Satravaha DDS, Med.Dent.

Sessions:

Speakers:

Timothy Scott Trulove DMD, MS
Sylvia A. Frazier-Bowers DDS, PhD
Somchai Satravaha DDS, Med.Dent.

Description:

This presentation will focus on the most up-to-date information about Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The participant will leave the presentation with a better understanding of he etiology, the epidemiology, and the personality traits of the ASD patient that makes treatment more challenging. Through this lecture it is hoped that a better understanding of ASD individuals will lead to a better orthodontic experience for the patient, the doctor and the staff.


Learning Objectives:

- Define etiology and epidemiology of Autism Spectrum Disorder.
- Develop a better assessment of personality traits of ASD orthodontic patients that will enhance communication.
- Institute ideas to improve treatment outcomes and enhance the patient/parent/doctor experience.

Description:

This lecture will provide an overview of current advances in the diagnosis and treatment of eruption disorders.  The focus of this lecture will be to recognize and diagnose common and rare eruption disorders encountered in orthodontic practices from both clinical and genetic perspectives.  Data from both genetic and clinical studies have helped to create a paradigm shift in contemporary orthodontic practices.  Applying genetic knowledge to the field of orthodontics will augment the current differential diagnosis of eruption disorders, permitting recognition of etiologically distinct disorders that respond to treatment in different ways.  That is, proper diagnosis equals proper treatment. This session will discuss Primary Failure of Eruption, ankylosis and delayed eruption with an emphasis on adopting a diagnostic rubric for proper management – or what to do and what not to do.


Learning Objectives:

- Assess eruption disorders that present in the orthodontic office.
- Utilize a diagnostic rubric to confirm or rule out PFE will be discussed.
- Diagnose and treat parameters for eruption disorders.

Description:

It is clear that treating cleft lip/palate is difficult and time-consuming as considerable challenges exist in realizing the desirable treatment goals. As for surgery which lies at the heart of treatment plan, many surgical procedures involved at different stages of the treatments make cleft lip/palate patients come to terms with the financial and emotional problems. This lecture will show the viable option of using a non-aggressive approach to achieve satisfactory outcome and avoid major surgical interventions in the later stage of treatment.


Learning Objectives:

- Discuss various cleft lip/palate treatment procedures.
- Demonstrate a non-aggressive approach to treat cleft lip/palate patients.
- Use a non-aggressive approach as a viable option to avoid major surgeries in cleft lip/palate treatment.

Mon | 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

6D

Topic: Facial Esthetics

1.5 CE Credits

Larry P. Tadlock DDS, MS | David M. Sarver DMD, MS | Georgios Kanavakis DDS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Larry P. Tadlock DDS, MS
David M. Sarver DMD, MS
Georgios Kanavakis DDS
Visually Enhanced Lecture

Description:

This lecture will discuss standards of care in light of recent events impacting the specialty of orthodontics. Dr. Tadlock will discuss why standards are important to the specialty and what standards are reasonable at this time, given the available research.


Learning Objectives:

- Discuss why standards of care are important and necessary for the specialty.
- Recognize areas of patient care where standards can currently be developed.
- Recognize areas where patient care standards can’t be developed without additional research.

Description:

Patients seeking esthetic treatment today wish to enhance their appearance for improved self-esteem and quality of life. Many have suggested use of the term appearance in conjunction with the term esthetics because it involves a broader assessment of the patient than just the smile. Smile esthetics are important, but the patient’s facial appearance is equally important, if not more important. A recent Canadian study has found women find men less attractive when they smile compared to when they take on swaggering or brooding poses, while men find women more attractive when they smile. What that means to orthodontists is that when planning treatment, it is imperative that we take into account the many elements of Macroesthetic evaluation and treatment. In this presentation, Dr. Sarver will cover many of these elements and how to weave them together in the adolescent patient in an effort to deliver a pleasing face in addition to the smile and occlusion.


Learning Objectives:

- See the face in a different way, in the 4th dimension.
- Assess the long-term emotional impact of your decisions in facial design.
- Utilize computer technology as an excellent patient interface for discussion.

Description:

This lecture will focus on factors that control self-perception of facial appearance. How does facial shape influence our opinion about our appearance? To what extend do personality and self-esteem affect our perception? Which facial features tend to have the most significant impact on self-perceived facial beauty? Three-dimensional photogrammetric images and psychometric data from a large population of young adults will be presented in order to address the abovementioned research questions. The outcomes of geometric morphometric methods for 3D analysis of facial shape will be discussed, in combination with results from standardized questionnaires assessing personality traits and self-esteem.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the effect of physical and psychological factors on self-perception of facial appearance.
- Evaluate differences between genders in self-perception of facial attractiveness.
- Assess the role of the orthodontist in affecting patient’s self-perception of facial attractiveness.

Mon | 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Team

1 CE Credit

Roger A. Hill MSA

Sessions:

Speakers:

Roger A. Hill MSA
Speaker Has Financial Interest

Description:

This one hour class provides an objective, in-depth look at the trends that are driving change in the practice of orthodontics so you can thrive, and not just survive. Also included is a explanation of corporte valuation metrics made simple - and whether it might be right for you! Finally, we will look at (1) tax reduction strategies and (2) proven techniques to increase and minimize your practice value.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify the three major trends changing the face of orthodontics: (1) Consolidation; (2) Consumerism and (3) Reimbursement.
- Explore the new valuation metric EBITDA, what it means, its significance for orthodontics and how to determine if it is the right metric for your practice.
- Reveal tax reduction strategies that can save tens of thousands and also explore how to maximize your practice value.

Mon | 2:45 PM - 3:45 PM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Team

1 CE Credit

Tung Nguyen DMD, MS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Tung Nguyen DMD, MS

Description:

The past two decades have seen a tremendous increase in the introduction of technology into the field of orthodontics. Rapid advancements and decreasing production cost for computer hardware and software technology, CAD-CAM appliances, 3D imaging and 3D printing have made it possible to incorporate these technology into clinical practice. However, the basic question remains “what is really useful, what is not, and what is best for our patient?” This lecture will highlight current available technology, shows clinical cases using the technology, and examine the data (or lack of data) regarding their effectiveness.


Learning Objectives:

- Discuss 3D Imaging technology and highlight current and future applications in orthodontics.
- Discuss the pros and cons of incorporating a 3D laboratory into a clinical practice.
- Examine “custom” computer designed brackets, wires and discuss the current available data on their efficacy.

Mon | 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

6A

Topic: Potpourri / Clinical

1.5 CE Credits

Sylvain Chamberland DMD, MSc | Eliane Hermes Dutra DDS, MSD, PhD | Anthony Macari DDS, MS | Robert Alan Stoner DDS, MS | Sergio Arturo Cardiel-Rios CertOrtho

Sessions:

Speakers:

Sylvain Chamberland DMD, MSc
Eliane Hermes Dutra DDS, MSD, PhD
Anthony Macari DDS, MS
Robert Alan Stoner DDS, MS
Sergio Arturo Cardiel-Rios CertOrtho

Description:

Patients with long anterior face height and anterior open bite often require a surgical approach to correct the vertical dimension. Temporary skeletal anchorage devices now offer the possibility of closing anterior open bite and reducing vertical dimension by intruding posterior teeth. Conversely, patients with reduced anterior facial height (short face syndrome) need elongation of the vertical dimension. In such case, orthognathic surgery is unavoidable if one wants to obtain normal vertical dimension. Review of the literature and case presentation will help to understand the biomechanics and treatment planning of these malocclusion.


Learning Objectives:

- Determine TADs placement to achieve intrusion of the buccal segment to close an open bite.
- Assess treatment goal to obtain normal vertical dimension.
- Distinguish mechanics to increase vertical dimension prior to orthognathic surgery for short face syndrome.

Description:

Injections of botulinum neurotoxin (botox) into the muscles of mastication have been used to alleviate the symptoms related to temporomandibular joint disorders. Studies have shown negative effects of Botox injection into the masseter in the mandibular ramus and condyle, but there are no investigations with the aim of understanding the cellular mechanisms behind the osteopenia caused by this type of treatment. This presentation will reveal the cellular responses and the structural changes of the mandibular condylar cartilage of transgenic mice after injection of Botox into the masseter.


Learning Objectives:

- Show that botox injection into the masseter of transgenic mice decreases cartilage width, cartilage thickness and proteoglycan content of the mandibular condylar cartilage.
- Demonstrate that this treatment reduces chondrocyte differentiation, proliferation and increases cell apoptosis in the mandibular condylar cartilage of mice.
- Illustrate that botox injection into the masseter decreases expression of proteins important for cell differentiation and mineralization at the mandibular condylar cartilage and subchondral bone of mice.

Description:

We describe a novel treatment approach combining lip shortening and orthognathic surgery to correct a long face syndrome atypically associated with a long upper lip in a 37-year-old Caucasian woman. To avoid the unpleasant deficient display of the maxillary teeth at rest and upon smiling after Lefort 1 maxillary impaction, the upper lip was shortened surgically resulting in a remarkable improvement of facial esthetics and achieving optimal relations between upper lip and maxillary teeth at rest and during smile. The treatment protocol and conditions for its application are discussed.


Learning Objectives:

- Diagnose a long upper lip in adult patients and evaluate the need of a soft tissue surgical approach.
- Identify constitutional limitations and individual anatomical variation that may negatively affect the esthetical outcome of the orthognathic surgery.
- Plan a onetime surgery of the soft and hard tissues for optimal esthetical and functional results.

Description:

Reducing time in braces and the burden of care for the Class II crowded and/or protrusive patient while controlling mandibular rotation can be achieved with early primary and premolar extraction.  Full cusp Class II correction can be obtained with the use of only a maxillary Nance holding arch as the mandibular molars migrate mesially, the mandible rotates counterclockwise, and incisor crowding unravels and facial balance improves.


Learning Objectives:

- Diagnose during the mixed dentition cases amenable to guided eruption.
- Reduce the time in braces and amount of tooth movement needed for the Class I or II crowded and/or protrusive case with guided eruption and serial extraction.
- Obtain full cusp Class II correction.

Description:

Biomechanical considerations to improve results for the face, the skeletal pattern and the dentition.


Learning Objectives:

- Compare the clinical effects when anterior teeth are not properly positioned.
- Manage an efficient Class II mechanotherapy.
- Determine some clinical variables according to the skeletal pattern for each patient.

Mon | 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

6B

Topic: Root Resorption

1.5 CE Credits

Glenn T. Sameshima DDS, CertOrth, PhD | Wellington Jose Rody Jr. DDS, CertOrth, MS | Belinda J. Weltman MSc, DMD, MS, FRCD(C)

Sessions:

Speakers:

Glenn T. Sameshima DDS, CertOrth, PhD
Wellington Jose Rody Jr. DDS, CertOrth, MS
Belinda J. Weltman MSc, DMD, MS, FRCD(C)

Description:

This lecture will summarize our current knowledge of this irritating problem by asking and answering a list of the ten most frequently asked questions (FAQ) about root resorption of relevance to the clinician with supporting evidence from research, literature, and clinical experience.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the diagnostic and treatment risk factors of external apical root resorption.
- Relate the risk of root resorption to new techniques and technologies.
- Manage root resorption at all stages of orthodontic treatment.

Description:

Early diagnosis of external root resorption is an important clinical goal in orthodontics. To date, radiography and computed tomography (CT) have been the standard techniques used by orthodontists to diagnose and monitor external root resorption. Nevertheless, the cost and the risks associated with radiation exposure make it difficult for routine use in dentistry. In addition, X-rays and CT scans have also many pitfalls including the fact that they do not indicate if the process of root resorption is ongoing or historical. Given these limitations, there is an indication for a more sensitive and safer diagnostic method for detecting root resorption. New technology platforms developed over the past few years have given clinical researchers the ability to identify novel biomarkers of root resorption in oral fluids. The future of this field will depend on further validation of specific markers and their incorporation into state-of-the-art assays that are reliable and cost-effective for broad implementation in clinical practice.


Learning Objectives:

- Recall the pathogenesis of root resorption.
- Discuss current biomarkers that may aid in root resorption diagnosis.
- Recognize the challenges associated with validating potential biomarkers of root resorption.

Description:

This lecture will review the scientific literature on orthodontically induced inflammatory root resorption (OIIRR). Detection, incidence and prevalence will be discussed. A summary of orthodontic treatment risk factors and patient systemic risk factors will be presented and examined from an evidence based approach. This will be followed by a review of some clinical management strategies aimed to decrease the incidence and severity of OIIRR.


Learning Objectives:

- Define the term Orthodontically induced imflammatory root resorption (OIIRR).
- Identify both orthodontic treatment and systemic risk factors associated with OIIRR.
- Evaluate and manage OIIRR as it occurs in clinical practice.

Mon | 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

6C

Topic: Craniofacial Care / Special Needs

1.5 CE Credits

Melih Motro DDS, PhD | Robyn S. Silberstein DDS, CertOrth, PhD | Pradip R. Shetye DDS, BDS, MDS | Pamela R. Hanson AS, BS, DDS, MS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Melih Motro DDS, PhD
Robyn S. Silberstein DDS, CertOrth, PhD
Pradip R. Shetye DDS, BDS, MDS
Pamela R. Hanson AS, BS, DDS, MS

Description:

Cleft lip and palate treatment is a long journey that begins at birth and continues until young adulthood. Its treatment requires established teams of specialists dedicated to treating this disorder. However, restricted access to such teams may result in poor outcomes. Many patients in such condition end up with inadequate results such as oronasal fistula or large gaps between the bony segments. Unfortunately, in many cases, secondary bone grafting at that stage may give sub-optimal results. Recently introduced alveolar distraction techniques became an important treatment alternative in such severe cases. In this lecture, archwise alveolar distraction appliance and technique, and the 3 Dimensional dentofacial changes it creates will be presented.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify the cases that may benefit from archwise alveolar distraction technique.
- Compare advantages of alveolar distraction to secondary bone grafting in cleft lip and palate cases.
- Determine whether alveolar distraction can be a good alternative to some surgical procedures.

Description:

Newly evolving comprehensive genetic testing is a game changer for clinical medical and dental practice. For orthodontists, there are times when clinically relevant genomic information enhances a personalized orthodontic treatment plan. Recognizing skeletal, facial and oral deviations, major and minor malformations as well as careful family and medical histories can offer clues to a genetic condition. Follow-up searches of databases and literature often suggest closer evaluation and referral to a clinical geneticist. This lecture will review recognition of unusual patterns in an orthodontic evaluation, when to refer to a clinical geneticist for evaluation, genetic testing and responding to genetic information acquired such as referrals, integrating new personalized protocols and limitations of interpretation.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize unusual patterns in phenotypes, clinical records and family history that warrant closer look in genetic databases and literature.
- Determine when to refer to a clinical geneticist for targeted genetic testing or Clinical Genome and Exome Sequencing (CGES).
- Respond to genetic information collected and manage/adjust treatment where indicated.

Description:

The management of patients with cleft lip and cleft palate requires extended orthodontic treatment and an interdisciplinary approach in providing these patients with optimal esthetics, function and stability. Orthodontic or orthopedic management in infancy, primary, mixed and permanent dentition and after the completion of facial growth will be discussed. The focus of this lecture will be on current concepts in the interdisciplinary approach to treatment planning and treatment sequencing during each phase of orthodontic treatment.


Learning Objectives:

- Evaluate the timing and objectives of orthodontic interventions during the different phases of grow.
- Apply pre and post secondary alveolar bone graft orthodontics.
- Analyze long-term outcomes of orthodontic treatment.

Description:

Distraction Osteogenesis (DO) is a gradual incremental bone lengthening technique. It offers therapeutic benefit to specific patients. Many patients with significant skeletal facial disharmony may require multiple surgical events throughout their lifetime. Understanding indications and timing for the use of distraction is crucial to the success of surgical/orthodontic care, thereby, minimizing the number of surgical events and improving the quality of the final result. Diagnostic decisions and well delivered multidisciplinary care are key to successful clinical outcomes. Recognizing how distraction fits into skeletal facial surgical care is the center of this discussion.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize when distraction is indicated as a surgical option.
- Recognize the timing of distraction as part of a comprehensive surgical/orthodontic plan.
- Recognize when distraction is not an appropriate treatment option.

Mon | 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

6D

Topic: Potpourri / Research

1.5 CE Credits

Keiji Moriyama DDS, PhD | Carla A. Evans DDS, DMSc | Juan Martin Palomo DDS, MSD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Keiji Moriyama DDS, PhD
Carla A. Evans DDS, DMSc
Juan Martin Palomo DDS, MSD

Description:

Expansion of the mid-palatal and cranial sutures is commonly performed to correct a narrow maxillary dental arch and craniosynostosis. Complications of this procedure include limited expansion range and relapse, and the risks increase with age because of tight interdigitation and ossification in the sutures. In this presentation, future possibilities for accelerated suture expansion using polypeptide hormones, such as relaxin (RLN) and soluble fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (sFGFR2), will be discussed.


Learning Objectives:

- Explain biology and pathology of sutural growth.
- Discuss suture expansion in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics.
- Recognize challenges to promotion of suture expansion in the craniofacial complex.

Description:

The paperless orthodontic practice is a reality, but improvements are needed to increase the usefulness of our digital information. We have software packages addressing many tasks, but often these systems don’t communicate. This lecture examines the progress being made by groups of clinicians, engineers and vendors to help the orthodontic community exchange orthodontic data with our colleagues and business partners. These working groups are defining and implementing informatics and biometrics standards. The ultimate goal is widespread interoperability of electronic health care records.


Learning Objectives:

- Demonstrate a basic understanding of the relevance of informatics and biometrics to orthodontic practice.
- Explain the importance of interoperability and transmissibility of electronic health records.
- Outline the standards development process.

Description:

This presentation will highlight some of the airway research from Case Western Reserve University, and describe efficient protocols that will help identify patients with sleep disorders that may not even know they have them. Simple questionnaires, and quick specific clinical exams can make the world of a difference to our patient’s quality of life. Traditionally we are trained to see and analyze the airway from the lateral view on a cephalometric film. But the airway is a three-dimensional (3D) structure, and that third dimension may be hiding something relevant to our diagnosis. When moving from 2D to 3D, distances and angles turn into areas and volumes, and understanding the airway may take orthodontics to the next level, increasing the scope of what can be done for our patient.


Learning Objectives:

- Implement sleep disorder risk assessment separately for adults and teenage patients.
- Perform an airway focused clinical exam, with objective outcomes.
- Analyze a segmented airway.

Mon | 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Team

1 CE Credit

Craig E. Scholz BA, MA, Psy.D

Sessions:

Speakers:

Craig E. Scholz BA, MA, Psy.D
Speaker Has Financial Interest

Description:

Current market conditions have led to an unparalleled competitive landscape in orthodontics. Dentists practicing orthodontics, market consolidation and direct to consumer treatment options require orthodontists to differentiate their specialty like never before.  Dr. Scholz, who is the Director of Emerging Technology at Ortho2, will highlight practice management techniques and orthodontic technology that can underscore this differentiation. Discussing systems and technology from his 30 years in the orthodontic industry, this lecture will focus on new strategies and technology solutions to help your patients clearly understand the benefits of being treated by an orthodontist.  Specific, unique examples of successful differentiation strategies of noted orthodontists will be shared to assist in the development of your own.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify key current threats to the orthodontic market.
- Analyze these potential threats as they relate to their practice.
- Evaluate potential strategies and technology to assist them in differentiating their practices.

Tue | 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Team

1 CE Credit

Simone McCormick

Sessions:

Speakers:

Simone McCormick
Visually Enhanced Lecture

Description:

Dental offices harbor sensitive patient data or Protected Health information (PHI). State and federal regulations were designed to protect patient data – to keep it confidential as well as secure.  Failure to do so can lead to unauthorized access, which can trigger government investigations and exposure to corrective action plans, fines and penalties as well as disciplinary actions and civil complaints


Learning Objectives:

- Identify and weigh potential privacy risks.
- Recognize HIPAA compliance hot spots and pitfalls.
- Analyze the level of HIPAA compliance at the practice.

Tue | 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

6A

Topic: Preadolescent Treatment

1.5 CE Credits

Steven A. Dugoni DMD, MSD | Heesoo Oh DDS, PhD, MSD | Chun-Hsi Chung DMD, MS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Steven A. Dugoni DMD, MSD
Heesoo Oh DDS, PhD, MSD
Chun-Hsi Chung DMD, MS

Description:

The lecture will demonstrate what is comprehensive early orthodontic treatment and how this treatment approach can be an effective treatment for the correction malocclusions in the mixed dentition.  Case sample will be shown demonstrating the mechanics to correct significant malocclusions with Phase I therapy. The benefits of arch length preservation with a mandibular lingual arch will be shown and long-term stability after lingual arch therapy.


Learning Objectives:

- Evaluate concepts of comprehensive early orthodontic treatment.
- Analyze the effective correction of malocclusions with Phase I therapy.
- Discuss handling of arch length deficiencies in the early mixed dentition.

Description:

One of the most heated controversies in orthodontics concerns the role of early treatment in the correction of Class II malocclusions. This presentation will describe the clinical outcomes of orthodontic intervention using the comprehensive mixed dentition treatment modality. The discussion will focus on comparing the effectiveness of early treatment of patients with moderate- severe Class II malocclusions to changes observed in untreated Class II and late single-phase Class II treatment samples. Other benefits and limitations will be discussed, as well as the long-term stability of Class II correction in patients who received early treatment in the mixed dentition will also be discussed.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the effectiveness and benefits of early treatment in correcting developing moderate-severe Class II malocclusions during the mixed dentition stage.
- Demonstrate some common characteristics of patients who presented successful early Class II correction.
- Evaluate the long-term stability of occlusal outcomes of Class II early treatment.

Description:

This lecture will describe the diagnosis and treatment of transverse problems in the preadolescent children. The rapid palatal expansion (RPE) is an integral treatment for maxillary transverse deficiency. A series of cone beam CT studies conducted at the University of Pennsylvania on the effects of RPE on the nasomaxillay complex in three planes of space will be reported. In addition, the effects of RPE on different age groups (younger and older children) will be presented and its clinical implications will be discussed.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the transverse problems. Attendees of this lecture will be able to make proper diagnosis and treatment planning.
- Manage the transverse problems. Attendees of this lecture will be able to know the treatment for the transverse problems.
- Describe the studies on the effects of RPE. Attendees of this lecture will be able to learn the effects of RPE on nasomaxillary complex in three dimensions.

Tue | 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

6B

Topic: Orthognathic Surgery

1.5 CE Credits

Harry L. Legan DDS | Timothy J. Tremont DMD, MS | Seung-Hak Baek DDS, MScD, PhD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Harry L. Legan DDS
Timothy J. Tremont DMD, MS
Seung-Hak Baek DDS, MScD, PhD

Description:

The timing of surgery during the treatment of the orthognathic surgical patient is a very important decision in developing an optimum treatment plan and delivering the best outcome. This has been studied, reported on, and practiced by clinicians for decades. The basic principles of sequencing surgery and orthodontics have been developed and tested over thousands of patients since the 1970’s. A “surgery first,” “orthodontics first,” or “surgery in the middle” approach is never going to be right for every patient. Each individual patient has an optimum time for surgery. Some of the principle criteria for sequencing surgical-orthodontic treatment will be presented in the time allowed.


Learning Objectives:

- Realize the advantages and disadvantages of surgery early or late in treatment of the orthognathic surgical patient.
- Identify patients’ facial morphologic and growth factors influencing timing of surgery.
- Perform biomechanical diagnosis, planning and procedures in the surgical-orthodontic sequence.

Description:

Misleading rules of thumb and common misperceptions exist regarding guidelines for maxillary skeletal expansion in nongrowing patients. The choice of a SARPE or a segmental osteotomy should be foremost a diagnostic decision. This lecture will present clear principles for choosing the appropriate method for skeletal expansion of the maxilla.


Learning Objectives:

- Describe the surgical similarities and differences between a SARPE procedure and a segmental osteotomy for maxillary skeletal expansion.
- Recognize how analysis of maxillary intra-arch discrepancies, and objectives for the transverse dimension influence the appropriate choice.
- Manage the presurgical and postsurgical orthodontics of both methods for skeletal expansion.

Description:

This presentation will give you information of STO flowchart and cases of Surgery-First Approach (SFA), which is currently used in the orthodontic treatment and orthognathic surgery, for both clinical practice and research.


Learning Objectives:

- Propose which kinds of orthodontic preparation before orthognathic surgery and post-operative orthodontic treatment should be performed for SFA.
- Identify the decompensation of the incisors, arch width discrepancy, simulation of post-operative orthodontic treatment, relapse rate and prevention of relapse in SFA.
- Discuss about the indications and contraindications of SFA.

Tue | 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

6C

Topic: Open Bite Correction

1.5 CE Credits

Tae-Woo Kim DDS, MSD, PhD | Flavia Artese DDS, MSc, PhD | You-Jin Lee DDS, PhD | Jeryl D. English DDS, MS | Kurtis Kasper PhD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Tae-Woo Kim DDS, MSD, PhD
Flavia Artese DDS, MSc, PhD
You-Jin Lee DDS, PhD
Jeryl D. English DDS, MS
Kurtis Kasper PhD

Description:

This lecture will present a review of the rationales, indications, methods, and effects of orthodontic treatment with second molar extractions in open bite cases. The second molar extraction may be a viable strategy in selected open-bite cases to remove ‘wedges’ and to drive first molars distally. But it is important to understand the indications and limitations of this treatment choice. The following topics will be explained with cases: 1. Effects of second molar extraction, 2. Indications and contradictions of second molar extraction, 3. Timing of extraction, 4. Limitations in second molar extraction, and 5. Cases.


Learning Objectives:

- Define the indications of second molar extraction to treat open bite cases.
- Analyze the limitations of second molar extraction to treat open bite cases.
- Diagnose the timing of extraction.

Description:

Anterior open bite is considered one of the malocclusions of most difficult treatment, especially regarding stability. The literature presents many researches on this subject, but with controversial information. There are disagreements on the definition of open bite, its etiology and types of treatment. Possibly, the lack of consensus on the etiology of the anterior open bite may have led to different types of treatment and can be the explanation for the high level of relapse of this malocclusion. The purpose of this presentation is to review the concepts of anterior open bite focusing on etiology, treatment methods and their stability and present criteria for the diagnosis and treatment of this malocclusion, based in its etiology, with examples of treated cases, stable for over 10 years.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify the etiological factors for anterior open bite.
- Compare the frequency open bite relapse according to different treatment modalities.
- Analyze different tongue positions at rest and its implication on open bite treatment stability.

Description:

This lecture will demonstrate orthodontic correction of patients who have skeletal and/or dental openbites accompanied by vertical discrepancies, facial imbalance and space discrepancies. In order to achieve long term stability of the dental correction along with a marked improvement of the balance and harmony of the face, certain treatment planning and force system precepts must be respected. The lecture will describe the fundamental concepts of treatment planning and force system management that must be employed during the correction of these difficult malocclusions.


Learning Objectives:

- Plan treatment so that proper mandibular incisor position can be achieved.
- Interpret the relationship of the force system to vertical dimension control.
- Carefully monitor any tongue or digit habits.

Description:

Successful treatment of open bite malocclusions depends upon a proper diagnosis and identification of the underlying etiology. This lecture will provide a brief overview of the dental and skeletal contexts in which open bite malocclusions may be viewed, and the development of appropriate treatment plans based upon the underlying etiologic factors. In addition, examples of applications of 3D printing technologies in the management of open bite malocclusions will be presented.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize and diagnose dental and skeletal open bite malocclusions.
- Distinguish between orthodontic, surgical, and collaborative treatment approaches.
- Discuss examples of the roles 3D printing can play in the treatment of open bite malocclusions.

Tue | 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

6D

Topic: Lingual Appliance Therapy

1.5 CE Credits

Didier Fillion DDS | Jun Wang DDS, PhD | Christopher S. Riolo DDS, MS, PhD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Didier Fillion DDS
Speaker Has Financial Interest
Jun Wang DDS, PhD
Christopher S. Riolo DDS, MS, PhD

Description:

Today, lingual systems provide individualized archwires  bent by a robot, not only for starting but also for the finishing sequence of treatment. By using a unique precise process for transferring brackets from digital set-up to malocclusion model, and preformed straight wires, it is possible  to practice lingual orthodontics successfully but more simply without robot and consequently without dependence  of a laboratory during the treatment. This lecture will explain how we determine   the most appropriate torque and angulation values to use for building digital set-up in order to make tooth movements more efficient and reduce the finishing adjustments. The presentation of cases will demonstrate that the combination of simplicity, accuracy and individualized prescription is the key to manage a lingual treatment in a shorter time and with a shorter chair time.


Learning Objectives:

- Analyze the different components of an individualized laboratory prescription.
- Compare the advantages of a lingual straight wire technique to a multi-bend wire technique.
- Outline the archwire selection of an extraction  and non-extraction case.

Description:

Anterior open bite is one of the most difficult dentofacial deformities to be treated in orthodontic field. In traditional classification, open bites can be divided into two categories: skeletal and dento-alveolar. However, what we are frequently dealing with in our clinic practice are the following two special types of anterior open bite: one is skeletal open bite; the other is open bite combined with incisor proclination, which is included in dento-alveolar abnormalities. If the former, it should be the result of deficiency of mandibular ramus as well as backward inclination of the mandible, therefore it shows an increased angle between mandibular body and ramus. If the latter, the mainly reason goes to the excessive proclination of both maxillary and mandibular incisors, so the patient may show up with convex profile but normal mandibular anatomical conformation. In this case, the main problem is the sagittal abnormality in spite of vertical contact deficiency between anterior teeth. We have explored the treatment design and orthodontic mechanics control of the above types of open bite with lingual orthodontic system. Due to the particularity of lingual system mechanics, torque loss might be a common side effect of conventional lingual system. So we choose customized lingual system with vertical slots for the anterior teeth and take advantage of ribbon-wise archwires at the same time to prevent torque loss. We also are going to compare the biomechanics between lingual and labial orthodontic system in anterior open bite treatment as biomechanics for lingual orthodontic system are quite different from labial one. Besides, the implant anchorage is used to assist vertical and sagittal controlling  to achieve optimum facial results in some difficult cases, and we are going to demonstrate the comparison of implant anchorage biomechanics in lingual and labial orthodontic systems.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the classification of anterior open bite.
- Distinguish the biomechanics between labial and lingual orthodontic system in the treatment of anterior open bite.
- Determine the treatment design in the treatment of anterior open bite via both labial and lingual orthodontic system.

Description:

Digital orthodontics is changing the way orthodontic care is planned and delivered. In this lecture we will show how digital custom lingual orthodontics can provide patients with missing and impacted anterior teeth a significantly improve treatment experience as well as excellent treatment outcomes.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify situations where the use of lingual orthodontic appliances can provide an improved esthetics during orthodontic treatment.
- Describe the digital workflow required to plan lingual orthodontic treatment missing/impacted anterior teeth.
- Describe the clinical workflow required to utilize lingual appliance to orthodontically treat impacted canines.

Tue | 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Team

1 CE Credit

Steven P. McEvoy BS, MSc

Sessions:

Speakers:

Steven P. McEvoy BS, MSc
Visually Enhanced Lecture
Speaker Has Financial Interest

Description:

For many years now HIPAA has been this looming threat on the Practice, so vague and seemingly complicated most Practices, let alone staff, really don’t know where to start – so they don’t.   I’d like to share some simple & bite sized practical approaches with you so you can feel confident heading back to the Practice and making headway with them.  We’ll be discussing 1) Understanding that HIPAA is a series of steps down a long road, 2) A handful of small, manageable steps along that journey, steps that you'll be comfortable with, 3) If getting Ransomware on one of the practice computers be a HIPAA violation and 4) Common mistakes made with computers that are at odds with HIPAA. I promise to limit the Geek speak and talk about issues in terms we can all understand. I encourage you to bring your own questions to share.


Learning Objectives:

- Assess that HIPAA is what you make of it – and is best to break it into a manageable progression of steps.
- Deduce that Ransomware presents a risk to the Practice and steps that you can take to manage this.
- Recognize common mistakes people make with computers that could lead to HIPAA issues and how to avoid them.

Tue | 9:45 AM - 11:15 AM

6A

Topic: Potpourri / Clinical Pearls

1.5 CE Credits

Su-Jeong Hong PhD | Gong-Liang Ernest Jou DDS, MS, PhD | Jianyong Wu DDS, MSD, PhD | Jing Feng BDS, MDS, PhD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Su-Jeong Hong PhD
Gong-Liang Ernest Jou DDS, MS, PhD
Jianyong Wu DDS, MSD, PhD
Visually Enhanced Lecture
Jing Feng BDS, MDS, PhD

Description:

This presentation demonstrates two different upper 4s / lower 5s extraction cases with differential diagnosis. One is a typical Class II malocclusion case in a growing patient, the other is a severe Class II malocclusion with TMJ problem.


Learning Objectives:

- Attain an awareness of basic concept of Differential Diagnosis and Space Analysis.
- Recognize the effects of High pull J-hook Headgear used in correction of Class II malocclusion.
- Generate an appreciation for the factors that may influence profile changes after treatment.

Description:

Clinically, with an incidence of 2%, maxillary canine impaction is one of the most frequently encountered problems. There are many possible sequelae to canine impactions, such as loss of arch length, dentigerous cyst formation, and external root resorption of the adjacent teeth. Impacted canines can be detected and corrected by appropriate clinical diagnosis, radiographic evaluation, and interceptive orthodontic treatment. This requires intimate cooperation between surgeons and orthodontists. Surgical techniques employed to manage them depend on positions of the impacted teeth. Orthodontists however, should hold the primary responsibility to coordinate all treatment efforts to give patients the most favorable outcome. Three different patients with various types of ectopic and impacted canines will be discussed in this lecture. The strategies of traction vary from the position and angulation of the impacted canines. Attendees will be able to recognize and manage maxillary canine impaction efficiently through comprehensive orthodontic treatment.


Learning Objectives:

- Evaluate the feasibility of orthodontic treatment.
- Define the complications of impacted canines and manage the sequelae.
- Solve impacted canine problems efficiently.

Description:

This lecture will present the results and conclusions of a study to evaluate the effects of a newly designed magnetic palatal expansion appliance with a reactivation system. A magnetic palatal expansion appliance was designed based on the repulsion forces of magnets combined with a reactivation system.


Learning Objectives:

- Obtain a new strategy of maxillary expansion.
- Gain insight into the bone deposition of the midpalatal suture during and after expansion.
- Gain the idea of retention of maxillary expansion.

Description:

Severe malocclusions with skeletal element impose a challenge to the current orthodontic specialty. Simple appliances such as brackets with archwires may not address complicated skeletal defects due to their inadequate impact on bone structures. Orthopedic approaches have proven to be effective solutions to the skeletal anomalies. The specially designed and customized manufactured orthopedic appliances, including segittally guided twin block (SGTB), cast RME, splint RPHG, bonded bite plane, and a variety of tailored devices, are used to modify the growth patterns of the oraofacial bone structures and therefore to correct jaw discrepancies efficiently and effectively. The satisfactory correction of severe skeletal deformities can also be achieved by approaches such as micro-implant anchorage, periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics (PAOO), micro-surgically assisted orthodontics (MSAO), or, if necessary, orthognathic intervention. This lecture will present an overview on the latest advances in clinical orthodontics evidenced by a wealth of literature review and beautifully finished cases.


Learning Objectives:

- Evaluate customized designing and fabrication of orthopedic appliances.
- Recognize that orao-maxillofacial growth pattern can be modified by orthopedic modalities.
- Diagnose the correction of severe skeletal deformities with a treatment regime beyond just braces.

Tue | 9:45 AM - 11:15 AM

6B

Topic: Orthognathic Surgery

1.5 CE Credits

Junji Sugawara DDS, DDSc, PhD | Vicente Hernandez-Soler MD, DMD, MSc, MPH | Chai Kiat Chng BDS, MDS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Junji Sugawara DDS, DDSc, PhD
Vicente Hernandez-Soler MD, DMD, MSc, MPH
Chai Kiat Chng BDS, MDS

Description:

Current Surgery First (SF) approaches can be classified into two rather different styles. One is the orthodontics driven style. In this style, skeletal problems are solved by surgery, and dental problems are fixed orthodontically. The other is the surgery driven style. In this approach, the aim is to solve both skeletal and dental problems by surgery as much as possible. The concept of SF that we practice is the orthodontics driven style. This approach was made possible by the application of TADs (miniplates and miniscrews) which enables predictable control of the entire dentition. With TADs in combination with multi-bracketed system, the extent of surgical intervention is significantly reduced, and complex orthodontic problems in post-surgical orthodontics can be successfully solved. In this presentation, the various biomechanics which applied to post-surgical orthodontics in Sendai SF will be discussed.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify the features of Sendai SF.
- Outline the recent protocol of Sendai SF.
- Recognize the biomechanics in post-surgical orthodontics of Sendai SF.

Description:

Processing strategies are different among the software programs, for segmentation, integration of the STL dental model and bone reposition. Modern 3D virtual planning for orthognathic surgery has critical advantages compared to conventional planning but also some disadvantages. The main advantage of the virtual simulation is the option to “play around” and easily test the effects of various possible skeletal corrections. Once the osteotomies are defined the software allows for quickly calculating different lengths or angulations of skeletal displacements. However, new problems arise in a virtual world such as the accuracy of the integration of the STL dental model into the CBCT model, or the true virtual bite, or setting the final occlusion virtually. By working virtually, haptic feedback is lacking. It is therefore better to combine the best of both worlds, virtually and manually. Virtual planning and simulation facilitates the appraisal of any number of options, testing the effects of different surgical movements and obtaining instant net measurements after every movement. In this way, an individual treatment plan can be adapted and optimized easily. The potential for faster, cheaper and better outcomes thought this emerging technology represents a paradigm shift in surgical planning for patient with dentomaxillofacial deformities.


Learning Objectives:

- Define the workflow for virtual orthognathic planning.
- Discuss the advantages and disadvantages over manual planning.
- Determine how to overcome the disadvantages.

Description:

Since the time of Hugo Obwegeser, who is considered the father of Orthognathic surgery, we have come a long way in terms of managing patients who require Ortho-orthognathic surgery. It is common refrain amongst orthodontist when they do a consult for a patient for combined Ortho-orthognathic management that the patient will look worse first before he or she looks better. There is also a long process of treatment spanning on average 2.5 to 3 years when conventional ortho-orthognathic methods are employed.  With surgery first approach becoming the treatment of choice with many orthodontist and surgeons around the world, it is good to take stock of where we are in managing such cases with both the methods. In this lecture, I would like to present my perspective on Surgery First approach with reference to conventional orthodontic-orthognathic approach.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize suitable cases for Surgery-First Orthodontics.
- Manage simple Surgery-First Orthodontics cases.
- Compare the pros and cons of Surgery-First Orthodontics vs Conventional Orthodontics-Orthognathic management.

Tue | 9:45 AM - 11:15 AM

6C

Topic: Cutting Edge Technology

1.5 CE Credits

Mohamed I. Masoud BDS, DMSc | Ayman Al Dayeh BDS, MSD, PhD | HyunDuck Nah DMD, MSD, PhD | Carroll Ann Trotman BDS, MS, MA

Sessions:

Speakers:

Mohamed I. Masoud BDS, DMSc
Speaker Has Financial Interest
Ayman Al Dayeh BDS, MSD, PhD
HyunDuck Nah DMD, MSD, PhD
Carroll Ann Trotman BDS, MS, MA

Description:

This  lecture will describe the problems associated with using the cranial base for orthodontic diagnosis and outcome assessment including the imperative  to reduce radiation exposure and encourage the development of  an alternative method.  Landmarks associated with the eyes valid and reproducible and are proposed as alternatives to the cranial base. Progress made in 3D photogrammetry that allows comprehensive dentofacial evaluation relative to the eyes will be discussed as well as current and future applications of photogrammetry in orthodontic diagnosis, planning, and the evaluation of treatment outcomes.


Learning Objectives:

- Describe the shortcomings of using the cranial base as a reference.
- Discuss the pros and cons of using the eyes as a reference instead of the cranial base.
- Outline how 3D photogrammetry can be used for orthodontic diagnosis.

Description:

The use of temporary skeletal anchorage devices (TADs) to aid in sutural separation is a promising new concept in clinical orthodontics. In this lecture, preliminary data on sutural deformation induced by TAD-supported and dental-borne devices will be presented. Specifically, we will discuss loading of the zygomatico-maxillary suture induced by bone-anchored maxillary protraction compared to traditional reverse pull headgear treatment, and deformation of midpalatal suture in TAD-supported compared to dental-borne expander. Additionally, preliminary data on bone formation and osteoblast differentiation at the zygomatico-maxillary suture during bone anchored maxillary protraction devices will be presented and discussed.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize the deformation of zygomaticomaxillary and midpalatal suture induced by dental-borne devices.
- Recognize the deformation of zygomaticomaxillary and midpalatal suture induced by skeletally-borne devices.
- Identify the difference in sutural loading between the dental- and skeletal-borne devices.

Description:

Carefully planned and executed orthognathic surgeries can achieve remarkable improvements in the occlusion and esthetics of patients with severe skeletal deformities and dysfunctional occlusion. Orthodontists are involved in all aspects of the clinical management of such patients, including initial case analysis, presurgical orthodontics, surgical planning with a surgeon and postsurgical orthodontics. Within this process, presurgical orthodontics is the most critical step that dictates treatment outcomes. Well-designed pre-surgical orthodontic set-up requires understanding of the nature of the problems/deformities, the types of jawbone movements required for the case and surgical limitations for these movements. This lecture will describe step-by-step orthodontic management of surgical cases with severe skeletal deformities and demonstrate how to utilize 2D and 3D virtual surgical planning tools in the design of pre-surgical orthodontic set-up.


Learning Objectives:

- Describe how to utilize 2D- and 3D-virtual surgical planning tools in the design of presurgical orthodontic set-up for patients with severe skeletal deformities.
- Recognize surgical limitations of certain jaw bone movements for these patients.
- Outline step-by-step pre- and post-surgical orthodontic management for the severe orthognathic cases.

Description:

Despite the advent of 3-D imaging for diagnosis of facial dysmorphologies, many orthodontists continue to focus on 2-D imaging (e.g. lateral cephalometric radiographs). One reason for the reluctance by orthodontists to use 3-D diagnostics is that they struggle with analyses that can be applied. This lecture will focus on facial soft tissue asymmetries and will demonstrate an analysis based on combined 3-D facial measures compared with normative data to produce a single ‘asymmetry’ score for targeted facial regions. Applications of the analysis will be demonstrated in different patient populations that present with asymmetry including, but not limited to, patients with repaired cleft lip and a palate and facial paralysis.


Learning Objectives:

- Perform personalization of a normative database using 3-D facial images.
- Identify approaches to 3D soft tissue analyses.
- Discuss different soft tissue asymmetries.

Tue | 9:45 AM - 11:15 AM

6D

Topic: Cutting Edge Research

1.5 CE Credits

David A. Covell Jr. DDS, PhD | Siddharth R. Vora BDS, MS

Sessions:

Speakers:

David A. Covell Jr. DDS, PhD
Siddharth R. Vora BDS, MS

Description:

In orthodontic treatment planning and assessment of results, an important consideration is the extent of bone supporting the teeth. With the advent of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), images of alveolar bone facial and lingual to roots of teeth can be readily created. In these regions bone thickness varies and in areas where bone is thin, limits of CBCT imaging capabilities are approached. This lecture will focus on results from cadaver and clinical studies where alveolar bone height and thickness was assessed by CBCT and by direct observation. The findings will be relevant to interpreting clinical assessments of alveolar bone using CBCT imaging.


Learning Objectives:

- Analyze variations in settings used in acquiring CBCT images and how these impact imaging of thin alveolar bone.
- Recognize considerations in interpreting CBCT images of alveolar bone based on results of cadaver and clinical investigations.
- Recognize research results on changes in alveolar bone height accompanying orthodontic treatment.

Description:

Timing of early Class III treatment using growth modification remains debated, as do the morphological outcomes in individuals. 3D imaging provides enhanced visualization and analysis of cranioskeletal structures, both for planning of orthodontic treatments as well as advancing research in the field of craniofacial orthopedics. This lecture will evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic usefulness of CBCT with an emphasis on the cranial base, and speculate on how 3D imaging can impact the future of Class III orthopedic treatments.


Learning Objectives:

- Discuss 3 dimensional outcomes of Class III orthopedic treatment modalities.
- Illustrate the integration of cranial base and midfacial regions and relate this to potential treatment outcomes.
- Evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic usefulness of CBCT and other 3D imaging modalities in orthopedic Class III correction.

Tue | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

20D

Topic: Mega Trends for Doctors & Ortho Team

1 CE Credit

Amy Kirsch BS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Amy Kirsch BS

Description:

The best orthodontic patients are referred by other patients and families versus finding you through advertising and external marketing. Do you have a solid internal marketing program in place in your practice? Would you like to have more internally referred quality new patients? Join us in this fast paced and highly informative lecture to discuss about the top 5 internal marketing techniques to boost your practice to the next level.


Learning Objectives:

- Develop confidence to ask quality patients to refer.
- Determine the best internal marketing ideas for their practice.
- Implement key customer service communication skills.

Tue | 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

6A

Topic: Aligners

1.5 CE Credits

William Dayan DDS, DipOrtho | Mazyar Moshiri DMD, MS, FICD

Sessions:

Speakers:

William Dayan DDS, DipOrtho
Mazyar Moshiri DMD, MS, FICD
Speaker Has Financial Interest

Description:

Aligner orthodontics is about customizing the force system generated by aligners to the teeth.  Orthodontists all went to university and spent many hours learning how to bend wires, but none of us have learned how to bend aligners. This lecture will teach you how to use the 3D ClinCheck Pro Software to bend aligners.


Learning Objectives:

- Analyze the movements they see on the screen and perform the required adjustments to improve their aligner treatment results.
- Identify the types of orthodontic movements that require the orthodontist to be prepared to modify aligners for success.
- Explain the bio-mechanics of aligner orthodontics that occurs in their patients, and not rely on what is incorrectly perceived as a “video of moving teeth”.

Description:

Invisalign can be an effective appliance to address various maloclcusions, especially when the treating doctor exercises diagnosis and treatment planning ability, with specific attention to Clincheck design. Participants of this lecture will garner how to properly design the ClinCheck treatment plan, including a better understanding of nuanced movements such as torque, expansion, and anterior intrusion in order to avoid iatrogenic sequelae (i.e posterior open bites).


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize which movements need to be exaggerated within the Clincheck treatment software to occur more predictably clinically.
- Identify the strengths and weaknesses of clear aligners.
- Recognize all of the variable which may cause posterior open bites with aligners.

Tue | 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

6B

Topic: Biomechanics

1.5 CE Credits

Gang Shen BDS, MDS, PhD | Noriyoshi Shimizu DDS, CertOrtho, PhD | Yeong-Charng Yen BDS, MDS

Sessions:

Speakers:

Gang Shen BDS, MDS, PhD
Noriyoshi Shimizu DDS, CertOrtho, PhD
Yeong-Charng Yen BDS, MDS

Description:

Correction of severe Class II malocclusion remains a challenge to clinical orthodontics. A typical phenotype of skeletal Class II malocclusion is characterized by prognathism of the maxilla and retruded positioning of the mandible, leading to a typical clinical manifestation of increased overjet and overbite coupled with excessive Curve of Spee. It has been shown that the reduction of severe overjet, overbite and Curve of Spee is hard to achieve by the use of fixed appliances only. The emergence of sagittally guided twin-block (SGTB) is intended to address this particular skeletal anomaly. SGTB consists of the upper component which is permanently bonded to the maxilla, and its lower removable counterpart, providing the forcible advancement of the mandible. The musculature force generated from the mandible is transferred to the maxilla which is therefore retracted backward. The lengthy period of forward positioning of the mandible also allows for the TMJ to adapt to stabilize the new positioning of the mandible. The ultimate treatment effects of SGTB include the minimization of jaw discrepancy, the restoration of Class I molar relationship, reduction of overjet and overbite, flattening of the Curve of Spee, and improvement of facial profile. This lecture will provide convincing evidence of SGTB effects based on a wealth of relevant research, extensive literature review and successfully finished cases.


Learning Objectives:

- Clarify the working mechanism of SGTB, i.e. retraction of the maxilla and sustainable repositioning of the mandible.
- Define the indications of SGTB, i.e. skeletal Class II malocclusion with retruded mandible.
- Verify the efficacy of SGTB, i.e. reduction of deep overjet, overbite and Curve of Spee combined with facial profile improvement.

Description:

Severe bimaxillary protrusion is one of the most difficult challenges in orthodontic treatment, but the maximum retraction of the anterior teeth is currently performed without much difficulty using TADs. Efficient anterior vertical control during bimaxillary protrusion treatment and mesio-distal diameter changes of the upper airway due to maximum retraction of anterior teeth are shown in this lecture.


Learning Objectives:

- Configure the treatment goals of severe bimaxillary protrusion using TADs.
- Explain the efficient mechanics for anterior vertical control during bimaxillary protrusion treatment using TADs.
- Recognize the changes of the upper airway due to maximum retraction of anterior teeth.

Description:

Transverse jaw discrepancy leads to adverse periodontal response, unstable dental camouflage, and less than optimal dentofacial esthetics. However, with a changed environment resulting from orthopedic maxillary expansion and growth, stability has been observed. The purposes are accommodating the dentition within alveolus and to achieve desired incisor inclination to the occlusal plane and to establish a good relationship with facial profile. The goals are teeth center & upright in the alveolus and well intercuspated. They are important for the function & stability of dentition, health of the TM joint and viability of the periodontium. With adding the TAD into orthodontic treatment choices; the boundaries of clinical orthodontic treatment has expanded considerably. The symmetrical facial pattern with symmetrical dentition is one of the primary important factors to be considered in the successfully clinical management of orthodontic patient. The development of the TAD helps orthodontists to reconsider the incisor position in clinical orthodontic treatment planning set up concerned to anterior alignment, anterior relationship (torque, tip, overjet, overbite & Bolton discrepancy), canine guidance, gingival level, crown size, anterior vertical display, and changes of skeletal vertical dimension & proportions. The presenter will present case by using TAD and case without using TAD in combination with some other different orthodontic biomechanics to correct transverse jaw discrepancy problems. The better and more harmonious nasolabial unit and labial mental unit of the face with pleasing smile can be achieved by orthodontic treatment in consideration of incisor position with concept of total dentition shifting treatment with the aid of TAD.


Learning Objectives:

- Identify transverse jaw discrepancy problems by using CBCT technology in combination with intraoral digital scanner. Attendees of this lecture will be able to use these clinical diagnostic instruments to recognize the clinical problems.
- Describe the different clinical strategies to manage the patients owns the transverse jaw discrepancy with hyper/hypo divergent facial patterns. Attendees of this lecture will be able to use different biomechanics to treat clinical patients.
- Discuss the incisor position in relations to the nasolabial & labiomental units in the transverse jaw discrepancy patients. Attendees of this lecture will be able to plan the incisor position well in the clinical treatment plan set up.

Tue | 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

6C

Topic: Genes / Biology

1.5 CE Credits

James K. Hartsfield DMD, MS, MSc, PhD | Lorri Ann Morford PhD | Cristina Teixeira DMD, MS, PhD

Sessions:

Speakers:

James K. Hartsfield DMD, MS, MSc, PhD
Lorri Ann Morford PhD
Cristina Teixeira DMD, MS, PhD

Description:

There are an increasing number of genetic tests available on a service, and potentially on a research, basis. The lecture will review what to expect from a service versus a research lab. There are also an increasing number of types of genetic testing. Examples will be given of the different types, and how these may be interpreted.


Learning Objectives:

- Differentiate between the expectations for and outcomes of service versus research labs.
- Describe the variety of genetic tests and what they can test for.
- Interpret the results given from genetic testing.

Description:

Even when we carefully examine a patient’s family history, past and current growth measurements, and a set of predetermined norms to predict their future craniofacial growth, it is no secret that many clinicians still encounter unexpected growth patterns in patients with challenging-to-treat malocclusions. This can especially be true when treating phenotypes that have a familial/genetic contribution, such as Class III malocclusion. The genes encoding Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 (IGF1), Growth Hormone Receptor (GHR), and Aromatase are important growth-related genes that can influence both facial and overall body growth, especially during the pubertal growth spurt. This lecture will provide new insights into how specific genetic variations in growth-related genes may be associated with different degrees of normal facial growth, and how a panel of markers may one day aid in improved growth predictions and orthodontic treatment planning.


Learning Objectives:

- Discuss the basis of patient-specific growth predictions (i.e. more precise estimates of facial growth).
- Describe how genetic variation in a number of growth-related genes may contribute to the shape and size of facial features.
- Recognize the hurdles that we face when applying genetic findings to clinical care and outcomes.

Description:

The most controversial issues in clinical orthodontics are related to the boundaries of tooth movement and skeletal change. One would not be able to address these issues without understanding the nature of biological changes in alveolar bone and sutures in response to mechanical stimulation. In an unprecedented effort of translational research, CTOR has been investigating the molecular and cellular events involving the mechanical stimulation of sutures and alveolar bone. Such research has contributed to the therapeutic advancements in non-surgical correction of severe skeletal deformities.


Learning Objectives:

- Recognize new theories in sutural growth and bone remodeling.
- Recognize how such advances have improved our understanding of craniofacial orthopedic treatment.
- Discuss how these significant advances in science can change the daily practice of Orthodontics.

Tue | 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

6D

Topic: Anything Goes!

1.5 CE Credits

Gerald D. Nelson DDS | Terry D. McDonald DDS, MS | Lili K. Horton BS, MS, DMD

Sessions:

Speakers:

Gerald D. Nelson DDS
Terry D. McDonald DDS, MS
Lili K. Horton BS, MS, DMD

Description:

For years we have treated cases without clearly knowing whether the roots of teeth remain safely within the alveolar housing. The use of CBCT as a diagnostic element and for post treatment evaluation is providing information to help us move teeth more safely.


Learning Objectives:

- Analyze slices out of DICOM scans to evaluate the alveolar housing border limitations.
- Adjust treatment plans in relation to the alveolar housing.
- Use judgment on the use of corticotomy and bone grafting to improve the alveolar housing.

Description:

There are many pathways to ABO quality of care and many avenues to efficiency of care but routinely achieving both of these goals for the majority of patients can be very difficult.  This lecture will briefly outline a proven protocol with a 40 year history of success in achieving these standards.


Learning Objectives:

- Appreciate how well established systems in all phases of orthodontic treatment can contribute to consistent AB